4/1 Friday Sessions

Multi-Scalar Conflicts over Hydraulic Fracturing (Part I)

 

Friday, 4/1/2016, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in Union Square 16, Hilton Hotel, 4th Floor

 

8:00 AM   Author(s): *Carlo E. Sica - Syracuse University 


 Abstract Title: Stacked Scale Frames: Building Hegemony for Fracking Across Scales

8:15 AM   Author(s): *Jen Schneider, PhD - Boise State University 


 Abstract Title: Frackademia, Divestment, and the Limits of Academic Freedom

8:30 AM   Author(s): *Sarah T. Romano, PhD - University of Northern Colorado 
*Wendy Highby - University of Northern Colorado 


 Abstract Title: The Politics of Fracking in Northeastern Colorado: Inquiry, Engagement, and Resistance in the Context of University Governance

8:45 AM   Author(s): *Karen Bakker - University of British Columbia 
Kate Neville, Dr. - University of Toronto 
Jenn Baka, Dr. - London School of Economics and Political Science 
Erika Weinthal, Dr. - Duke University 


 Abstract Title: "What's in the water?": Corporate disclosure and investor-activists in debates over fracking

9:00 AM   Discussant: Susan M. Christopherson - Cornell University


Discussant(s):
Susan M. Christopherson - Cornell University 

 

Session Description: This session will examine multi-scalar conflicts generated by the practice and politics of hydraulic fracturing and how these conflicts, in turn, shape environmental governance. Various forms of conflict (broadly defined) have accompanied the expansion as well as the prospect of hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," in the United States, Europe, and Latin America (Fry 2013; Kuuskraa 2011; Mares 2012; Weile 2014). Some conflicts—evident in social movements, protests, policy struggles and negotiations, and more—have been documented (see for example, Carre 2012; Toan 2015; Schneider 2015; Smith & Ferguson, 2013; Svampa 2015; Vesalon & Cretan 2015). Yet there is more to be gained from systematic examination of these conflicts within environmental governance frameworks. How do conflicts over unconventional oil and gas development emerge and what explains the particular shape they take? How do the politics of scale, including the multi-sectoral character of fracking, influence these conflicts? How do these conflicts influence and/or help to shape environmental governance in practice? Papers in this session will emphasize elite actors, institutions as "sites" of fracking, and grassroots responses.

 

 

Economic Geography and Grand Challenges 1: Multi-stakeholder arenas

 

Friday, 4/1/2016, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in Golden Gate 4, Hilton Hotel, Lobby Level

 

8:00 AM   Introduction: James T. Murphy - Clark University


 
8:20 AM   Author(s): *Suntje Schmidt - Institute for Regional Development and Structural Planning 
Felix C. Müller - IRS 
Oliver Ibert - IRS 
Verena Brinks - IRS 


 Abstract Title: Open Region - A Policy Model for addressing Grand Challenges

8:40 AM   Author(s): *C. Patrick Heidkamp, Ph.D. - Southern Connecticut State University 
John E. Morrissey, Ph.D. - Liverpool John Moores University 


 Abstract Title: Just Sustainability Transitions in the Coastal Zone

9:00 AM   Author(s): *Bernhard Fuhrer - Swiss Network for International Studies 


 Abstract Title: Distilling the SDGs - the roles and involvement of Geneva based International Organizations in the creation of the "agenda for change 2030"

 

Session Description: Grand challenges such as climate change, ageing societies and food security feature prominently on the agenda of policymakers at all scales, from the EU down to local and regional authorities. What these challenges have in common is that they are complex and multi-sided: Multiple causes and consequences co-exist, often covering several societal domains. Secondly, they are uncertain and unstructured. They defy easy solutions and a partial solution at one point in time may generate new, additional problems at a different point in time or in a different location. Thirdly, they are difficult to manage: Many different actors are involved that represent different interests, have different problem perceptions and advocate different solutions. 

Thus, these challenges have in common, that they not only (or even primarily) require technological advancements, but that they necessitate transformative, system change. These are challenges that require the input and collaboration of a diverse set of societal stakeholders to combine different sources of knowledge in new and useful ways - a process that is often highly place-dependent and co-evolving with the historically grown institutional configurations of cities, regions or countries. Still, whereas such co-evolutionary and place-dependent innovation processes have occupied the minds of economic geographers in recent decades, the respective analytical perspectives remained largely limited to a supply-side perspective on innovation and to addressing questions of economic growth and regional competitiveness or resilience.

Various literatures on transformative social change (e.g. in the sustainability transitions debate or social movement theory) have in turn developed a more nuanced understanding of the collective and distributed agency involved in inducing radical change in unsustainable socio-technical systems. Yet, these authors remained rather silent about the place-dependency of transformative change processes (Hansen and Coenen in press; Murphy in press). 

This session aims at exploring whether and how combining recent work in institutional, relational and evolutionary economic geography with work from various literatures on transformative social change can improve our understanding of the place-dependency involved in addressing grand challenges. More importantly, how can grand challenges push economic geographers to go beyond their previous focus and interests on economic growth and development? And how can existing concepts from economic geography help to specify the place-dependency of transformative social change processes?

We welcome papers that make theoretical as well as empirical contributions to this theme, related to specific grand challenges or to economic geography and transformative change. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

•      Challenge-driven innovation policy
•      Policy coordination and governance at multiple scales
•      Structural and transformational system failures
•      Demand articulation, legitimation, up-scaling and diffusion of environmental innovation
•      Place-making, scales and territories of grand challenges 
•      Conflict and power struggles in radical transformations
•      Impact of technological relatedness on transformative change
•      From local experimentation to institutionalization
•      Varieties of capitalism and transformative change

 

 

Alternative Fuels, Vehicles, and Infrastructure #1

 

Friday, 4/1/2016, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in Union Square 6, Hilton Hotel, 4th Floor

 

8:00 AM   Discussant: Michael Kuby - Arizona State University


 
8:10 AM   Discussant: Scott Kelley - Arizona State University


 
8:20 AM   Author(s): *Michael Kuby, PhD - Arizona State University 
Ellen Stechel, PhD - Arizona State University-Lightworks 
Mikhail Chester, PhD - Arizona State University-Civil Engineering 


 Abstract Title: Wireless Streetcar Propulsion Options: Technologies and Tradeoffs

8:40 AM   Author(s): *Bo Dong, PhD student - University of New South Wales, Canberra 
Stuart Pearson, A/Prof. - University of New South Wales, Canberra 


 Abstract Title: Researching real policy-making for biofuels in Australia and China

9:00 AM   Author(s): *Andrew S. Martinez, Ph.D - California Air Resources Board 


 Abstract Title: California's GIS-Driven Analyses for Planning Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure for FCEVs

9:20 AM   Author(s): *Scott Kelley - Arizona State University 


 Abstract Title: Freeways, Trip types, and Choice Sets: How do Early Adopters of Alternative Fuel Vehicles (AFVs) Access Refueling Stations near Complex Freeway Interchanges?

Discussant(s):
Michael Kuby - Arizona State University 
Scott Kelley - Arizona State University 

 

Session Description: The United States relies on petroleum for 93% of its transportation energy, and conversely, 71% of all petroleum consumption is for transportation purposes. The need for alternatives to petroleum-powered transport is clear, and we are finally seeing commercialization of products and some marketplace success. Alternative fuels include compressed and liquefied natural gas, renewable natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (propane), ethanol, biodiesel, hydrogen, plug-in electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles, which can be used for cars, trucks, buses, motorcycles and hybrid bicycles, trains, ships, drones, and airplanes. California is on the forefront of this transition through ambitious programs for zero-emission sales requirements and fuel station development. Hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles have made their long-awaited commercial debut in California over the last year with the launch of the Toyota Mirai and Hyundai Tucson FCVs. This field offers exciting research opportunities for a wide variety of geographic research.

This session is open to all geographic perspectives, alternative fuels, modes of transport, regions of the world, and types of infrastructure. A sample of topics include: policies and incentives; facility location and network design; driving/charging/refueling/purchasing behavior; technology choice and tradeoffs; diffusion; environmental impacts, benefits, well-to-wheel analyses; transition trajectories and economics; education; grid benefits; emergency services; equity and vulnerability analysis; and social construction of the issue. Similarly, we encourage submissions using a variety of methods employed by geographers in this field, including GIS analysis and modeling, optimization, statistical analysis, agent-based modeling, survey research, policy analysis, and critical theory.

 

 

Multi-Scalar Conflicts over Hydraulic Fracturing (Part II)

 

Friday, 4/1/2016, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Union Square 16, Hilton Hotel, 4th Floor

 

10:00 AM   Author(s): *Madeline Gottlieb - UC Davis Ecology Graduate Group - Davis, CA 


 Abstract Title: Citizen Response to Shale Hydrocarbon Development

10:15 AM   Author(s): *Andrea Christina Wirsching - Community and Regional Planning, The University of Texas at Austin 


 Abstract Title: Geographies of Fracking in South Texas: Land Rights, Power and Agency in Colonias

10:30 AM   Author(s): Stacia S Ryder - Colorado State University 
*Peter Mandel Hall - Colorado State University 


 Abstract Title: Understanding divergent governance outcomes in a multiscalar hydraulic fracturing action field: Power and Politics of Scale and Space in Northern Colorado

10:45 AM   Author(s): *Anika Leithner - California Polytechnic State University 
*Elizabeth Lowham - California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo 


 Abstract Title: Framing Fracking: Language and Environmental Policy in International Perspective

11:00 AM   Author(s): *Tiffany Grobelski, PhC - University of Washington, Seattle 


 Abstract Title: "Let's talk about shale gas": Mobilization against shale gas exploration in Poland

 

Session Description: This session will examine multi-scalar conflicts generated by the practice and politics of hydraulic fracturing and how these conflicts, in turn, shape environmental governance. Various forms of conflict (broadly defined) have accompanied the expansion as well as the prospect of hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," in the United States, Europe, and Latin America (Fry 2013; Kuuskraa 2011; Mares 2012; Weile 2014). Some conflicts—evident in social movements, protests, policy struggles and negotiations, and more—have been documented (see for example, Carre 2012; Toan 2015; Schneider 2015; Smith & Ferguson, 2013; Svampa 2015; Vesalon & Cretan 2015). Yet there is more to be gained from systematic examination of these conflicts within environmental governance frameworks. How do conflicts over unconventional oil and gas development emerge and what explains the particular shape they take? How do the politics of scale, including the multi-sectoral character of fracking, influence these conflicts? How do these conflicts influence and/or help to shape environmental governance in practice? Papers in this session will examine fracking discourses as well as diverse case studies of state and citizen responses to fracking.

 

 

Alternative Fuels, Vehicles, and Infrastructure #2

 

Friday, 4/1/2016, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Union Square 6, Hilton Hotel, 4th Floor

 

10:20 AM   Author(s): *Craig Morton - University of Aberdeen 
Jillian Anable - University of Aberdeen 
Godwin Yeboah - University of Aberdeen 
Caitlin Cottrill - University of Aberdeen 


 Abstract Title: Exploring the Spatial Pattern of Demand in the Early Market for Electric Vehicles: Evidence from the United Kingdom

10:40 AM   Discussant: Christopher D. Higgins - McMaster University


 
10:45 AM   Discussant: Craig Morton - University of Aberdeen


 
10:50 AM   Discussant: Svenja Seelinger


 
10:55 AM   Discussant: Scott Kelley - Arizona State University


 
11:00 AM   Discussant: Michael Kuby - Arizona State University


 
11:05 AM   Discussant: Andrew S. Martinez - California Air Resources Board


 
11:10 AM   Discussant: Bo Dong - University of New South Wales, Canberra

 

Session Description: The United States relies on petroleum for 93% of its transportation energy, and conversely, 71% of all petroleum consumption is for transportation purposes. The need for alternatives to petroleum-powered transport is clear, and we are finally seeing commercialization of products and some marketplace success. Alternative fuels include compressed and liquefied natural gas, renewable natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (propane), ethanol, biodiesel, hydrogen, plug-in electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles, which can be used for cars, trucks, buses, motorcycles and hybrid bicycles, trains, ships, drones, and airplanes. California is on the forefront of this transition through ambitious programs for zero-emission sales requirements and fuel station development. Hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles have made their long-awaited commercial debut in California over the last year with the launch of the Toyota Mirai and Hyundai Tucson FCVs. This field offers exciting research opportunities for a wide variety of geographic research.

This session is open to all geographic perspectives, alternative fuels, modes of transport, regions of the world, and types of infrastructure. A sample of topics include: policies and incentives; facility location and network design; driving/charging/refueling/purchasing behavior; technology choice and tradeoffs; diffusion; environmental impacts, benefits, well-to-wheel analyses; transition trajectories and economics; education; grid benefits; emergency services; equity and vulnerability analysis; and social construction of the issue. Similarly, we encourage submissions using a variety of methods employed by geographers in this field, including GIS analysis and modeling, optimization, statistical analysis, agent-based modeling, survey research, policy analysis, and critical theory.

 

 

Economic Geography and Grand Challenges 2: Path creation

 

Friday, 4/1/2016, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Golden Gate 4, Hilton Hotel, Lobby Level
 
10:00 AM   Author(s): *Andrea Simone - Sapienza, University of Rome 


 Abstract Title: The relatedness dilemma: regional diversification in US cleantech clusters between industrial branching and institutional drivers. The case of Boston

10:20 AM   Author(s): *Jasper Wellbrock - Institute of Economic and Cultural Geography, Leibniz University of Hanover 


 Abstract Title: Freaks and visionaries - The role of agents in new path creation in the German wind energy technology

10:40 AM   Author(s): *Markus Steen - SINTEF Technology & Society 
Jens Hanson - University of Oslo 


 Abstract Title: Nothing develops from scratch: sustainability transitions and the dynamics between old and new industrial paths

11:00 AM   Author(s): *Kristina Westermark, PhD - Stockholms University 


 Abstract Title: Small Swedish 'vulnerable' municipalities with large 'dominating' companies: the case of securing an educated labor force

11:20 AM   Discussant: Koen Frenken - Utrecht University

Discussant(s):
Koen Frenken - Utrecht University 

 

Session Description: Grand challenges such as climate change, ageing societies and food security feature prominently on the agenda of policymakers at all scales, from the EU down to local and regional authorities. What these challenges have in common is that they are complex and multi-sided: Multiple causes and consequences co-exist, often covering several societal domains. Secondly, they are uncertain and unstructured. They defy easy solutions and a partial solution at one point in time may generate new, additional problems at a different point in time or in a different location. Thirdly, they are difficult to manage: Many different actors are involved that represent different interests, have different problem perceptions and advocate different solutions.

Thus, these challenges have in common, that they not only (or even primarily) require technological advancements, but that they necessitate transformative, system change. These are challenges that require the input and collaboration of a diverse set of societal stakeholders to combine different sources of knowledge in new and useful ways - a process that is often highly place-dependent and co-evolving with the historically grown institutional configurations of cities, regions or countries. Still, whereas such co-evolutionary and place-dependent innovation processes have occupied the minds of economic geographers in recent decades, the respective analytical perspectives remained largely limited to a supply-side perspective on innovation and to addressing questions of economic growth and regional competitiveness or resilience.

Various literatures on transformative social change (e.g. in the sustainability transitions debate or social movement theory) have in turn developed a more nuanced understanding of the collective and distributed agency involved in inducing radical change in unsustainable socio-technical systems. Yet, these authors remained rather silent about the place-dependency of transformative change processes (Hansen and Coenen in press; Murphy in press).

This session aims at exploring whether and how combining recent work in institutional, relational and evolutionary economic geography with work from various literatures on transformative social change can improve our understanding of the place-dependency involved in addressing grand challenges. More importantly, how can grand challenges push economic geographers to go beyond their previous focus and interests on economic growth and development? And how can existing concepts from economic geography help to specify the place-dependency of transformative social change processes?

We welcome papers that make theoretical as well as empirical contributions to this theme, related to specific grand challenges or to economic geography and transformative change. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

•      Challenge-driven innovation policy
•      Policy coordination and governance at multiple scales
•      Structural and transformational system failures
•      Demand articulation, legitimation, up-scaling and diffusion of environmental innovation
•      Place-making, scales and territories of grand challenges
•      Conflict and power struggles in radical transformations
•      Impact of technological relatedness on transformative change
•      From local experimentation to institutionalization
•      Varieties of capitalism and transformative change

 

 

Social Geographies of Wind Energy

 

Friday, 4/1/2016, from 1:20 PM - 3:00 PM in Taylor Room B, Hilton Hotel, 6th Floor

1:20 PM   Author(s): *Chad Walker - Western University 


 Abstract Title: "By the time neighbours find out, it's a sure thing!" - Wind Energy and Procedural Justice in Canada

1:40 PM   Author(s): *Geraint Ellis, Prof - Queen's University Belfast 
Karen Jenkinson, Dr - School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen’s University, Belfast 
Susana Batel, Dr - Cis-IUL, Lisbon University Institute, Portugal 


 Abstract Title: Facts, Hacks and Turbines: Using Media Analysis to Understand Trends in the Social Acceptance of Irish Wind Energy

2:00 PM   Author(s): *Stephen J. Stadler, Ph.D. - Oklahoma State University 
J. Scott Greene, Ph.D. - University of Oklahoma 


 Abstract Title: The New Anti-Wind Geography of Oklahoma

2:20 PM   Author(s): Becca C Castleberry - University of Oklahoma 
*John Scott Greene - University of Oklahoma 
Steven Stadler - Oklahoma State University 
Shannon Ferrell - Oklahoma State University 


 Abstract Title: Impacts of Wind Energy Development on Oklahoma Schools

2:40 PM   Discussant: Chad Walker - Western University

Discussant(s):
Chad Walker - Western University 

 

Session Description: In efforts to mitigate the effects of climate change, increase energy sovereignty and build green economies, governments around the world have turned to renewable energy in recent years. Despite the several advantages of wind energy, there has been growing 'resistance movements', particularly in rural communities facing potential development (Baxter et al., 2013). These localized opposition groups contrast public opinion polling which has shown very high levels of support for wind energy development- a phenomenon Bell et al. (2005) deemed the 'Social Gap'. This paradox between public support and local opposition was originally blamed on selfish, NIMBY (Not In My Backyard) motivations (Wolsink, 2000)- though more contemporary research has found more nuanced and context-specific explanations of resistance (Devine-Wright, 2005; Ellis et al., 2007; Walker et al., 2014).

This session invites papers from all social scientists looking at the social dynamics and challenges of wind energy developments. We are particularly interested in speakers whose research sits within the intersection of energy policy and the local realities of wind energy in the developed world.  The session is also open to researchers employing a wide range of approaches including but not limited to interviews and focus groups, mixed methods, discourse analysis, and quantitative analyses. 

 

 

Energy Transitions I: Bioenergy

 

Friday, 4/1/2016, from 1:20 PM - 3:00 PM in Union Square 6, Hilton Hotel, 4th Floor

 

1:20 PM   Author(s): *Dr. Pankaj Lal - Montclair State University 
Bernabas Wolde - Montclair State University 
Pralhad Burli - Montclair State University 


 Abstract Title: Woody Biomass Based Energy in Southern United States: Why Forest Landowners Care?

1:40 PM   Author(s): *Latha Baskaran - Oak Ridge National Laboratory 
Henriette Jager - Oak Ridge National Laboratory 
Jasmine Kreig - Oak Ridge National Laboratory 
Gangsheng Wang - Oak Ridge National Laboratory 
Craig Brandt - Oak Ridge National Laboratory 


 Abstract Title: Identifying opportunities for sustainable bioenergy production in two southern tributary basins of the Mississippi River Basin: focus on water quality, quantity and biodiversity

2:00 PM   Author(s): *Justine Law - Denison University 


 Abstract Title: Scalar interactions across wood bioenergy economies

2:20 PM   Author(s): *Nazli Z. Uludere Aragon - Arizona State University 


 Abstract Title: Land Availability for the Cultivation of Second Generation Bioenergy Crops in California

2:40 PM   Author(s): *Norberto Quinones - SUNY - Binghamton 


 Abstract Title: Potential areas to locate macroalgae mariculture systems using GIS: Eucheuma isiforme in Puerto Rico's EEZ case study.

 

Session Description: Energy transitions are inherently complex and prolonged affairs, and there are numerous unanswered questions about the timing and nature of the transition to whatever comes after the fossil fuel era. These questions cross disciplinary and epistemological lines, making them particularly suited to exploration from the perspectives of geography. These sessions present research related to transitions in energy sources and uses, along with the social, political and/or economic implications of those transitions.

 

 

Future pathways in energy geographies: a panel discussion with past EESG Chairs

 

Friday, 4/1/2016, from 1:20 PM - 3:00 PM in Metropolitan A, JW Marriott Hotel, 2nd Floor


Panelist(s):
Barry D. Solomon - Michigan Technological University 
Martin (Mike) J. Pasqualetti - Arizona State University 
Scott Jiusto - Worcester Polytechnic Institute 
Marilyn A. Brown - Georgia Institute of Technology 

 

Session Description: This panel brings together past chairs of the Energy and Environment Speciality Group to reflect on the evolution of energy geography.

 

 

Urbanization and Environmental Sustainability (I) 

 

Thursday, 3/31/2016, from 1:20 PM - 3:00 PM in Beijing, Marker Hotel, 2nd Floor

 

1:20 PM   Author(s): *Christine Wen - Cornell University 


 Abstract Title: The political economy of development planning in western China

1:40 PM   Author(s): *Frank Swiaczny - Federal Institute for Population Research, Germany 


 Abstract Title: Re-urbanization under Conditions of Ageing and Shrinking - A Conceptual View on Spatial Population Dynamics in Germany.

2:00 PM   Author(s): *Francia Torres - U.S. Bureau Of the Census 
Francia Torres - 
Tanya Sadrak - U.S. Bureau Of the Census 
Alexandra Zablotny - Pathways Intern U.S. Bureau of the Census 


 Abstract Title: Simple Tools, Great Solutions: Creating Boundaries for Puerto Rico Urbanizations

2:20 PM   Author(s): *Yan Sun - Peking University 
Shuqing Zhao - Peking University 


 Abstract Title: Rates and patterns of urban expansion in Jing-Jin-Ji urban agglomeration over the past three decades: a hierarchical patch dynamics approach

2:40 PM   Author(s): *Wenze Yue - Zhejiang University 


 Abstract Title: Measuring urban sprawl of large cities in Yangtze River Economic Belt with multi-source dataset

 

Session Description: In the past several decades, the world has experienced fast urbanization, and the urban growth is expected to continue in the next few decades. Urbanization modifies the Earth's terrestrial surface, and therefore, has profound impacts on agricultural practices, energy balance, and watershed hydrology from local to regional and even global scales and causes associated environmental problems. Urbanization will increase the challenges of environmental sustainability in terms of growing water, energy, and food demands. There is a growing need, from both the science and policy making communities, for information on urbanization and its environmental impacts from local to global scales. Improved understanding of urbanization can help us develop better practices in land use planning and management for sustainable urban development. 

This session invites presentations focusing on urbanization and environmental sustainability. The potential topics can include urbanization mapping and modeling, urban water and energy use, urban emissions, urban health, urbanization impacts on water-energy- food nexus, urban climate, urban ecosystem services, urban disaster assessment and management, and sustainable urban planning. We encourage studies that will advance our understanding of sustainable urban development. We would like to welcome any papers that showcase recent advances and original contributions in such topics. 

 

 

Economic Geography and Grand Challenges 3: Governance

 

Friday, 4/1/2016, from 1:20 PM - 3:00 PM in Golden Gate 4, Hilton Hotel, Lobby Level

 

1:20 PM   Author(s): *Markus M. Bugge - NIFU Nordic Institute for Studies in Innovation, Research and Education 


 Abstract Title: From grand challenges to daily practice - The conditions for collaborative exploration in the public sector

1:40 PM   Author(s): *Tom A. Daamen - Delft University of Technology 
Ellen van Bueren - Delft University of Technology 


 Abstract Title: The Transformative Force of Glocal Port-City Projects: Integrated Governance in the Rotterdam Region

2:00 PM   Author(s): *Lucien Georgeson - University College London 
Mark Maslin, PhD - University College London 
Martyn Poessinouw - University College London, kMatrix 
Steve Howard - kMatrix 


 Abstract Title: Global megacities differing adaptation responses to climate change

2:20 PM   Author(s): *Josephine V. Rekers - Lund University 
Teis Hansen - Lund University 


 Abstract Title: Grand challenges and cities: Why do experiments not occur in every or in any city?

2:40 PM   Discussant: Teis Hansen - Department of Human Geography and CIRCLE, Lund University

Discussant(s):
Teis Hansen - Department of Human Geography and CIRCLE, Lund University

 

Session Description: Grand challenges such as climate change, ageing societies and food security feature prominently on the agenda of policymakers at all scales, from the EU down to local and regional authorities. What these challenges have in common is that they are complex and multi-sided: Multiple causes and consequences co-exist, often covering several societal domains. Secondly, they are uncertain and unstructured. They defy easy solutions and a partial solution at one point in time may generate new, additional problems at a different point in time or in a different location. Thirdly, they are difficult to manage: Many different actors are involved that represent different interests, have different problem perceptions and advocate different solutions.

Thus, these challenges have in common, that they not only (or even primarily) require technological advancements, but that they necessitate transformative, system change. These are challenges that require the input and collaboration of a diverse set of societal stakeholders to combine different sources of knowledge in new and useful ways - a process that is often highly place-dependent and co-evolving with the historically grown institutional configurations of cities, regions or countries. Still, whereas such co-evolutionary and place-dependent innovation processes have occupied the minds of economic geographers in recent decades, the respective analytical perspectives remained largely limited to a supply-side perspective on innovation and to addressing questions of economic growth and regional competitiveness or resilience.

Various literatures on transformative social change (e.g. in the sustainability transitions debate or social movement theory) have in turn developed a more nuanced understanding of the collective and distributed agency involved in inducing radical change in unsustainable socio-technical systems. Yet, these authors remained rather silent about the place-dependency of transformative change processes (Hansen and Coenen in press; Murphy in press).

This session aims at exploring whether and how combining recent work in institutional, relational and evolutionary economic geography with work from various literatures on transformative social change can improve our understanding of the place-dependency involved in addressing grand challenges. More importantly, how can grand challenges push economic geographers to go beyond their previous focus and interests on economic growth and development? And how can existing concepts from economic geography help to specify the place-dependency of transformative social change processes?

We welcome papers that make theoretical as well as empirical contributions to this theme, related to specific grand challenges or to economic geography and transformative change. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

•      Challenge-driven innovation policy
•      Policy coordination and governance at multiple scales
•      Structural and transformational system failures
•      Demand articulation, legitimation, up-scaling and diffusion of environmental innovation
•      Place-making, scales and territories of grand challenges
•      Conflict and power struggles in radical transformations
•      Impact of technological relatedness on transformative change
•      From local experimentation to institutionalization
•      Varieties of capitalism and transformative change

 

 

Transportation Futures, Energy, and Climate Change: Translating Research into Policy in California

 

Friday, 4/1/2016, from 3:20 PM - 5:00 PM in Continental 5, Hilton Hotel, Ballroom Level

 

3:20 PM   Speaker: Daniel Sperling - University of California, Davis
 
4:00 PM   Discussant: Marilyn A. Brown - Georgia Institute of Technology

 

Session Description: Brief Abstract: The chasm between climate science and climate policy is vast.   Focusing on the transition to low-carbon transportation, Professor Sperling will address this science-policy-political chasm. He will present a case study of California, where he is a central player in designing and implementing climate policies, as both an academic and government regulator. What are we learning, what is the role of research and universities, and what are policy paths forward?

Bio: "Daniel Sperling is Professor of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science and Policy, and founding Director of the Institute of Transportation Studies at the University of California, Davis (ITS-Davis). Dr. Sperling has led ITS-Davis to international prominence by building strong partnerships with industry, government, and the environmental community, integrating interdisciplinary research and education programs, and connecting research with public outreach and education.

Dr. Sperling is recognized as a leading international expert on transportation technology assessment, energy and environmental aspects of transportation, and transportation policy. He was the 2013 chair of the California Fuel Cell Partnership and is 2015 Chair of the Transportation Research Board of the National Academies. He received the 2013 Blue Planet Prize for being "a pioneer in opening up new fields of study to create more efficient, low-carbon, and environmentally beneficial transportation systems" and 2010 Heinz Award for his "achievements in the research of alternative transportation fuels and his responsibility for the adoption of cleaner transportation policies in California and across the United States." He is author or editor of over 200 technical articles and 12 books, including Two Billion Cars (Oxford University Press, 2009), and has testified 7 times to the U.S. Congress on alternative fuels and advanced vehicle technology.

He earned his Ph.D. in Transportation Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley (with minors in Economics and Energy & Resources) and his B.S. in Environmental Engineering and Urban Planning from Cornell University. Professor Sperling worked two years as an environmental planner for the US Environmental Protection Agency and two years as an urban planner in the Peace Corps in Honduras."

 

 

Urbanization and Environmental Sustainability (II)

 

Thursday, 3/31/2016, from 3:20 PM - 5:00 PM in Beijing, Marker Hotel, 2nd Floor

 

3:20 PM   Author(s): *Yuanyuan Yang - College of Resources Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University 
Yansui Liu - College of Resources Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University 


 Abstract Title: Spatiotemporal conversion from rural settlements and arable land in the process of urbanization in Beijing during 1985-2010

3:37 PM   Author(s): *Ron Mahabir - Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science, George Mason University 
Peggy Agouris - Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science, George Mason University 
Andrew Crooks - Computational Social Science Program, Department of Computational and Data Sciences, George Mason University 
Anthony Stefanidis - Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science, George Mason University 
Arie Crotoru - Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science, George Mason University 


 Abstract Title: Challenges and Opportunities of Mapping and Modeling Slums in a Digital Big Data Era.

3:54 PM   Author(s): *Qing Tian - George Mason University 
Maria Lemos - University of Michigan 


 Abstract Title: Rural-Urban Interaction and Vulnerability of Rural Households to Climatic Hazards: A Case from China

4:11 PM   Author(s): *Julie A. Silva - University of Maryland, College Park 
Fernando Sedano - University of Maryland, College Park 


 Abstract Title: Africa's Urban Revolution & The Future of Forests: Lessons from Mozambique's Charcoal Trade

4:28 PM   Author(s): *Yuyu Zhou - Iowa State University 


 Abstract Title: Modeling Urbanization and its Implication in Building Energy Use

 

Session Description: In the past several decades, the world has experienced fast urbanization, and the urban growth is expected to continue in the next few decades. Urbanization modifies the Earth's terrestrial surface, and therefore, has profound impacts on agricultural practices, energy balance, and watershed hydrology from local to regional and even global scales and causes associated environmental problems. Urbanization will increase the challenges of environmental sustainability in terms of growing water, energy, and food demands. There is a growing need, from both the science and policy making communities, for information on urbanization and its environmental impacts from local to global scales. Improved understanding of urbanization can help us develop better practices in land use planning and management for sustainable urban development. 

This session invites presentations focusing on urbanization and environmental sustainability. The potential topics can include urbanization mapping and modeling, urban water and energy use, urban emissions, urban health, urbanization impacts on water-energy- food nexus, urban climate, urban ecosystem services, urban disaster assessment and management, and sustainable urban planning. We encourage studies that will advance our understanding of sustainable urban development. We would like to welcome any papers that showcase recent advances and original contributions in such topics. 

 

 

Governing Extraction/ Experiencing Extraction I: Shale Gas

 

Friday, 4/1/2016, from 3:20 PM - 5:00 PM in Taylor Room B, Hilton Hotel, 6th Floor

 

3:20 PM   Author(s): *Thomas Loder - Texas A&M University 


 Abstract Title: Exploring the Opinions of Longer-Term Residents Regarding Hydraulic Fracturing and Economic Development in the Bakken Shale, North Dakota

3:40 PM   Author(s): *Amanda E Wooden - Bucknell University 


 Abstract Title: Fractured Activism: Place Politics and Nationalistic Narratives in Central Pennsylvanian Shale Gas Drilling Discourses

4:00 PM   Author(s): *Heather Plumridge Bedi, PhD - Dickinson College 


 Abstract Title: Pipeline Perils in Pennsylvania: Contested Shale Gas Fracking and Transportation

4:20 PM   Author(s): *Karen Edelstein - FracTracker Alliance 
Kyle Ferrar - FracTracker Alliance 


 Abstract Title: Oil and Gas Extraction: at what costs to communities?

4:40 PM   Author(s): *Vicki Oppenheim - University of North Texas, Geography Department 
Matthew Fry, Ph.D. - University of North Texas, Geography Department 
Myungsup Kim, Ph.D. - University of North Texas, Economics Department 
Murray Rice, Ph.D. - University of North Texas, Geography Department 
Jeffrey Rous, Ph.D. - University of North Texas, Economics Department 
Chetan Tiwari, Ph.D. - University of North Texas, Geography Department 


 Abstract Title: A Preliminary Analysis of Gas Well Density and Socioeconomic Variables in the City of Denton, Texas

 

Session Description: Nationalism, energy sovereignty, and other state-led narratives justify extraction for myriad reasons, including the manufacturing of consent (Hudgins and Poole 2014). In the name of sovereignty, some governments nationalize mining operations (Perreault 2012). The nationalization of extraction resources may create new spaces for profit (Ross 2012), and may impact political and development trends (Andreasson 2014). Even in nations with partial or no nationalization of resource extraction, narratives of national identity and security may drive particular practices. For example, India relies heavily on coal to meet national 'energy aspirations' (Coal India Limited 2014), while Obama justifies expanded hydraulically fractured natural gas to achieve energy independence in the United States. "Frack a well, bring a soldier home" is a commonly seen billboard in shale gas drilling country in the U.S. (Russell 2013). Energy corporations often mobilize these state-centric narratives to generate public support, yet are harshly critical of national sovereignty arguments when threatened with partial nationalization. The geographies of extraction extend these national priorities into local realities for those living close to and/ or working within sites of extractions (Russell 2013). Nations justify rapid expansion of extraction to meet growing domestic energy requirements, nationalism goals, and/ or other ambitions, but how are these priorities experienced for those living at or close to sites of extraction, resource transportation or processing? These sessions explore the national trends in the global energy sector context, while putting them in conversation with everyday extraction.

 

 

Economic Geography and Grand Challenges 4: Socio-technical Transitions

 

Friday, 4/1/2016, from 3:20 PM - 5:00 PM in Golden Gate 4, Hilton Hotel, Lobby Level

 

3:20 PM   Author(s): *Christian Binz - CIRCLE, Lund University 
Lea Fuenfschilling - CIRCLE, Lund University 


 Abstract Title: Global socio-technical regimes? Comparing transition dynamics in the Chinese and Australian wastewater sector

3:40 PM   Author(s): Lars Coenen - CIRCLE, Lund University 
*Teis Hansen - Department of Human Geography and CIRCLE, Lund University 
Bernhard Truffer - EAWAG 


 Abstract Title: From path-dependence to path-shaping: institutional dynamics in regional transformation

4:00 PM   Author(s): *LEIRE URKIDI - University of the Basque Country 
Eneko Garmendia - BC3 
Ortzi Akizu - University of the Basque Country 
Iñaki Barcena - University of the Basque Country 
Izaro Basurko - Ekologistak Martxan 
Rosa Lago - University of the Basque Country 
Martin Mantxo - Ekologistak Martxan 


 Abstract Title: Energy Transitions in the Global South: a Latin American Civil Society Approach

4:20 PM   Author(s): *Caroline Boules - George Mason University 


 Abstract Title: Climate Change and Water Governance in Tunisia

4:40 PM   Discussant: Josephine V. Rekers - Lund University

Discussant(s):
Josephine V. Rekers - Lund University 

 

Session Description: Grand challenges such as climate change, ageing societies and food security feature prominently on the agenda of policymakers at all scales, from the EU down to local and regional authorities. What these challenges have in common is that they are complex and multi-sided: Multiple causes and consequences co-exist, often covering several societal domains. Secondly, they are uncertain and unstructured. They defy easy solutions and a partial solution at one point in time may generate new, additional problems at a different point in time or in a different location. Thirdly, they are difficult to manage: Many different actors are involved that represent different interests, have different problem perceptions and advocate different solutions.

Thus, these challenges have in common, that they not only (or even primarily) require technological advancements, but that they necessitate transformative, system change. These are challenges that require the input and collaboration of a diverse set of societal stakeholders to combine different sources of knowledge in new and useful ways - a process that is often highly place-dependent and co-evolving with the historically grown institutional configurations of cities, regions or countries. Still, whereas such co-evolutionary and place-dependent innovation processes have occupied the minds of economic geographers in recent decades, the respective analytical perspectives remained largely limited to a supply-side perspective on innovation and to addressing questions of economic growth and regional competitiveness or resilience.

Various literatures on transformative social change (e.g. in the sustainability transitions debate or social movement theory) have in turn developed a more nuanced understanding of the collective and distributed agency involved in inducing radical change in unsustainable socio-technical systems. Yet, these authors remained rather silent about the place-dependency of transformative change processes (Hansen and Coenen in press; Murphy in press).

This session aims at exploring whether and how combining recent work in institutional, relational and evolutionary economic geography with work from various literatures on transformative social change can improve our understanding of the place-dependency involved in addressing grand challenges. More importantly, how can grand challenges push economic geographers to go beyond their previous focus and interests on economic growth and development? And how can existing concepts from economic geography help to specify the place-dependency of transformative social change processes?

We welcome papers that make theoretical as well as empirical contributions to this theme, related to specific grand challenges or to economic geography and transformative change. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

•      Challenge-driven innovation policy
•      Policy coordination and governance at multiple scales
•      Structural and transformational system failures
•      Demand articulation, legitimation, up-scaling and diffusion of environmental innovation
•      Place-making, scales and territories of grand challenges
•      Conflict and power struggles in radical transformations
•      Impact of technological relatedness on transformative change
•      From local experimentation to institutionalization
•      Varieties of capitalism and transformative change

 

 

Energy Transitions II: Society

 

Friday, 4/1/2016, from 3:20 PM - 5:00 PM in Union Square 6, Hilton Hotel, 4th Floor

 

3:20 PM   Author(s): *Ali Adil - University of Texas - Arlington 


 Abstract Title: From vulnerability to resilience: A theoretical framework for resilient energy systems based on socio-technical and socio-ecological perspectives

3:40 PM   Author(s): *Kerry McGowan - University of Richmond 


 Abstract Title: Can Solar Really Make it in Mexico? A Socio-Cultural Analysis

4:00 PM   Author(s): *Sarah McCall - University of Denver 


 Abstract Title: The Political Economy of Energy Development in Nicaragua

4:20 PM   Author(s): *Deepti Chatti - Yale University 


 Abstract Title: Political ecology of household energy: Gender, caste, class, and cookstoves in rural India

4:40 PM   Author(s): *Graeme Sherriff - University of Salford 


 Abstract Title: People say 'Have you had the heating on?' - Experiences of Retrofit in Greater Manchester

 

Session Description: Energy transitions are inherently complex and prolonged affairs, and there are numerous unanswered questions about the timing and nature of the transition to whatever comes after the fossil fuel era. These questions cross disciplinary and epistemological lines, making them particularly suited to exploration from the perspectives of geography. These sessions present research related to transitions in energy sources and uses, along with the social, political and/or economic implications of those transitions.

 

 

Governing Extraction/ Experiencing Extraction II

 

Friday, 4/1/2016, from 5:20 PM - 7:00 PM in Taylor Room B, Hilton Hotel, 6th Floor

 

5:20 PM   Author(s): *Emily Billo - Goucher College 


 Abstract Title: Resource extraction and the right to protest: Contentious politics in Intag, Ecuador

5:40 PM   Author(s): *Lauren Miyoko Baker, Ph.D. - Soka University of America 


 Abstract Title: Environmental emergencies as a prism to both critique and reinforce "social responsibility" in the northeast Peruvian Amazon

6:00 PM   Author(s): *Meredith J. DeBoom - University of Colorado at Boulder 


 Abstract Title: Extracting Place and Placing Extraction: Politics of Marine Phosphate Mining in Namibia

6:20 PM   Author(s): *Maurizio Totaro - University of Ghent 


 Abstract Title: Integrating into the Global, Disintegrating the Local: Oil Production and the Fragmented Social Geographies of Western Kazakhstan

6:40 PM   Discussant: Heather Plumridge Bedi - Dickinson College

Discussant(s):
Heather Plumridge Bedi - Dickinson College

 

Session Description: Nationalism, energy sovereignty, and other state-led narratives justify extraction for myriad reasons, including the manufacturing of consent (Hudgins and Poole 2014). In the name of sovereignty, some governments nationalize mining operations (Perreault 2012). The nationalization of extraction resources may create new spaces for profit (Ross 2012), and may impact political and development trends (Andreasson 2014). Even in nations with partial or no nationalization of resource extraction, narratives of national identity and security may drive particular practices. For example, India relies heavily on coal to meet national 'energy aspirations' (Coal India Limited 2014), while Obama justifies expanded hydraulically fractured natural gas to achieve energy independence in the United States. "Frack a well, bring a soldier home" is a commonly seen billboard in shale gas drilling country in the U.S. (Russell 2013). Energy corporations often mobilize these state-centric narratives to generate public support, yet are harshly critical of national sovereignty arguments when threatened with partial nationalization. The geographies of extraction extend these national priorities into local realities for those living close to and/ or working within sites of extractions (Russell 2013). Nations justify rapid expansion of extraction to meet growing domestic energy requirements, nationalism goals, and/ or other ambitions, but how are these priorities experienced for those living at or close to sites of extraction, resource transportation or processing? These sessions explore the national trends in the global energy sector context, while putting them in conversation with everyday extraction.

 

 

Energy Transitions III: Case Studies

 

Friday, 4/1/2016, from 5:20 PM - 7:00 PM in Union Square 6, Hilton Hotel, 4th Floor

 

5:20 PM   Author(s): *Tom Broekel - Institute of Economic and Cultural Geography, University of Hannover 
Christoph Alfken - Institut of Economic and Cultural Geography, Leibniz University of Hannover 


 Abstract Title: Gone with the wind? The impact of wind turbines on tourism demand

5:40 PM   Author(s): *Michel Georges Deshaies - Université de Lorraine 


 Abstract Title: The new energy landscapes in the lignite basin of Lusatia (Germany)

6:00 PM   Author(s): *Scott E Phillips, GISP - California State University, Stanislaus 
Brian L Cypher, PhD - California State University, Stanislaus 


 Abstract Title: Solar Energy Development and Endangered Upland Species of the San Joaquin Valley of California: Identifying Conflict Zones

6:20 PM   Author(s): *Hannah Poisson-Smith - Northern Michigan University 


 Abstract Title: Transition to Cleaner Power Generation

6:40 PM   Author(s): *Michael J. Dorsch - Graduate Center, CUNY 


 Abstract Title: Toward Climate Change Mitigation, Energy Justice, and Resilience: Electricity Infrastructure Transitions and Transformations

 

Session Description: Energy transitions are inherently complex and prolonged affairs, and there are numerous unanswered questions about the timing and nature of the transition to whatever comes after the fossil fuel era. These questions cross disciplinary and epistemological lines, making them particularly suited to exploration from the perspectives of geography. These sessions present research related to transitions in energy sources and uses, along with the social, political and/or economic implications of those transitions.

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