4/9 Sunday Sessions


Sustainable Urbanization: Challenges and Opportunities (1)

is scheduled on Sunday, 4/9/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in Columbus 2, Marriott, First Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Urban Geography Specialty Group

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Yuyu Zhou - Iowa State University

Wenze Yue - Zhejiang University

Bailang Yu - East China Normal University 

Chair(s):

Yuyu Zhou - Iowa State University

Abstract(s):

8:00 AM   Author(s): *Xizhi Zhao - East China Normal University

*Bailang Yu - East China Normal University

Ting Lian - East China Normal University

Shunqiang Deng - East China Normal University

Chengshu Yang - East China Normal University

Jianping Wu - East China Normal University 

 Abstract Title: How can nighttime light detect events? Preliminary results.

 

8:20 AM   Author(s): *Xuecao Li - Iowa State University

Yuyu Zhou - Iowa State University

 Abstract Title: Response of vegetation phenology to urbanization in the conterminous United States

8:40 AM   Author(s): *Wenze Yue - Zhejiang University

Xue Liu - Zhejiang University

Yang Chen - Zhejiang University

Yong Liu - Southwest University 

 Abstract Title: Urban Livable Index Developing and Citizen Exposure Analysis: A Case of Hangzhou

9:00 AM   Author(s): *Shunqiang Deng - ECNU

Yixiu Huang - East China Normal University

Bailang Yu - East China Normal University

Xizhi Zhao - East China Normal University

Jianping Wu - East China Normal University

Chenshu Yang - East China Normal University

Zuoqi Chen - East China Normal University

Kaifang Shi - East China Normal University

 Abstract Title: Spatialization of Population Using Nighttime Light Remote Sensing Images and Social Sensing Data

 

9:20 AM   Author(s): *Ambe J. Njoh, Ph.D. - University of South Florida

 

 Abstract Title: Socio-economic development implications of urbanization in Africa


Session Description: In the past several decades, the world has experienced fast urbanization, and the urban growth is expected to continue in the next few decades. Urbanization modifies the Earth's terrestrial surface, and therefore, has profound impacts on agricultural practices, energy balance, and watershed hydrology from local to regional and even global scales and causes associated environmental problems. Urbanization will increase the challenges of environmental sustainability in terms of growing water, energy, and food demands. There is a growing need, from both the science and policy making communities, for information on urbanization and its environmental impacts from local to global scales. Improved understanding of urbanization can help us develop better practices in land use planning and management for sustainable urban development.

This session invites presentations focusing on challenges and opportunities in sustainable urbanization. The potential topics can include urbanization mapping and modeling, urban water and energy use, urban emissions, urban health, urban water-energy- food nexus, urban climate, urban ecosystem services, urban disaster assessment and management, and sustainable urban planning. We encourage studies that will advance our understanding of sustainable urban development. We would like to welcome any papers that showcase recent advances and original contributions in such topics.


Decolonizing Water: Indigenous water politics, resource extraction, and settler colonialism

is scheduled on Sunday, 4/9/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in Room 310, Hynes, Third Level

Sponsorship(s):

Indigenous Peoples Specialty Group

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Karen Bakker - University of British Columbia

Glen Coulthard - University of British Columbia

Chair(s):

Karen Bakker - University of British Columbia

Introduction:

Karen Bakker - University of British Columbia

Panelist(s):

Glen Coulthard - University of British Columbia

Andrew Curley

Naomi Simmonds - The University of Waikato

Discussant(s):

RDK Herman - National Museum of the American Indian 

Session Description: As emblematized by the ongoing protests at Standing Rock, water is a foundational element—biophysical, epistemological, and spiritual—in Indigenous societies and lifeways. This crucial life source has come under increased threat due to the claimed necessity of extractivist development projects, as demonstrated in the marked increase in proposed pipeline construction, liquefied natural gas development, hydraulic fracturing, and bitumen crude oil production across Turtle Island. These extractivist projects threaten the land and waterways that sustain not only our own individual and collective lives, but also the lives of all of our relations: human and more-than-human. In the United States and Canada, the intensification of hydraulic fracturing has rapidly accelerated processes of accumulation by dispossession, in a context of "light touch" regulation in which new and significant breaches of Indigenous rights have emerged, and in a context in which threats to water are scantily monitored, under-regulated, and under-reported.

This panel brings together theorists of water politics, neoliberalization, and decolonization. We encourage a focus on the contemporary politics of resistance and resurgence by Indigenous peoples. We seek a diversity of perspectives that offer critical engagement with the ideas and practices of decolonization. Equally, we also welcome interventions that challenge decolonization as a framework for analyzing and interpreting water politics. We particularly welcome contributions focused on the water-energy nexus, oil and gas (especially hydraulic fracturing), and pipelines.

 Alternative green practices 1

 is scheduled on Sunday, 4/9/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in Gardner A, Sheraton, Third Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Economic Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Julia Affolderbach - University of Hull

Christian Schulz - University of Luxembourg

Rob Krueger - Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Chair(s):

Christian Schulz - University of Luxembourg

Abstract(s):

8:00 AM   Author(s): *Thomas Smith - University of St Andrews 

 Abstract Title: Making a More-Than-Human Economy: Construction Practices, Experiment and Creative Spaces of the Maker Movement

8:20 AM   Author(s): *Greig Tor Guthey, PhD - Department of Liberal Studies & Geography Program 

 Abstract Title: Farming the Campus: Five years of urban agriculture on a commuter campus

8:40 AM   Author(s): *Trina Hamilton - University At Buffalo (SUNY)

 Abstract Title: Ethics on the move: How do ethical markets evolve and how much can they change? 

9:00 AM   Author(s): *Diana Watts - Trinity University

Anna Demeo, Ph.D. Director, Community Energy Center - College of the Atantic

 Abstract Title: Social Networks, Social Learning and Adaptive Management Preliminary Evidence and a Research Agenda

Session Description: Debates around the capacity of and limits to the current capitalist mode of production have led many to reconceptualize economic models and to rethink how development occurs in practice. One widely promoted strategy within these debates is the 'green economy'.  The idea of a green economy is not new as illustrated by the spread of eco-industrial parks, green clusters, carbon finance and clean technologies. The green economy in practice is often reduced to financial and technological fixes through the diffusion, adoption and mainstreaming of green innovations and technologies or to new green products, services, and markets that sustain the growth imperative of the capitalist system.

This session explores alternative green economies by bringing together work on actually existing alternative practices, experiments and economies that break free from the described current paradigms of greening.  We are looking for examples of new, alternative, diverse, and socially just conceptions of the economy (in a wider sense) and economic development both in the global North and South.

Sustainable Urbanization: Challenges and Opportunities (2)

is scheduled on Sunday, 4/9/2017, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Columbus 2, Marriott, First Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Urban Geography Specialty Group

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group 

Organizer(s):

Yuyu Zhou - Iowa State University

Wenze Yue - Zhejiang University

Bailang Yu - East China Normal University

Chair(s):

Bailang Yu - East China Normal University

Abstract(s):

10:00 AM   Author(s): *Matthew Robert Stiller - Kent State University

V. Kelly Turner, PhD - Kent State University

 Abstract Title: The Impacts of Homeowners Associations on Residential Land Ecology in Phoenix, Arizona

10:20 AM   Author(s): *Yuyu Zhou - Iowa State University

 Abstract Title: Urbanization and Environmental Sustainability

 10:40 AM   Author(s): *Benjamin Stewart - The World Bank Group

Mark Roberts, Sr Urban Economist - The World Bank Group

Brian Blankespoor, Environmental Specialist - The World Bank Group

Chandan Deuskar, PhD Student - University of Pennsylvania 

 Abstract Title: Urbanization and Development: Is Latin America and the Caribbean Different from the Rest of the World 

11:00 AM   Author(s): *Nancy Davis Lewis, PhD - East-West Center

 Abstract Title: The Sustainable Development Agenda 2030: Health, Gender and Urbanization

11:20 AM   Author(s): Kejia Hu -

*Xuchao Yang - Institute of Island and Coastal Ecosystems, Ocean College, Zhejiang University

Jieming zhong -

Fangrong Fei -

Jiaguo Qi - 

 Abstract Title: Spatially explicit mapping of extreme heat health risk utilizing environmental and socioeconomic data

Session Description: In the past several decades, the world has experienced fast urbanization, and the urban growth is expected to continue in the next few decades. Urbanization modifies the Earth's terrestrial surface, and therefore, has profound impacts on agricultural practices, energy balance, and watershed hydrology from local to regional and even global scales and causes associated environmental problems. Urbanization will increase the challenges of environmental sustainability in terms of growing water, energy, and food demands. There is a growing need, from both the science and policy making communities, for information on urbanization and its environmental impacts from local to global scales. Improved understanding of urbanization can help us develop better practices in land use planning and management for sustainable urban development.

This session invites presentations focusing on challenges and opportunities in sustainable urbanization. The potential topics can include urbanization mapping and modeling, urban water and energy use, urban emissions, urban health, urban water-energy- food nexus, urban climate, urban ecosystem services, urban disaster assessment and management, and sustainable urban planning. We encourage studies that will advance our understanding of sustainable urban development. We would like to welcome any papers that showcase recent advances and original contributions in such topics.

Decolonizing Water: Indigenous water politics, resource extraction, and settler colonialism

 is scheduled on Sunday, 4/9/2017, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Room 310, Hynes, Third Level

Sponsorship(s):

Indigenous Peoples Specialty Group

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Karen Bakker - University of British Columbia

Glen Coulthard - University of British Columbia

Chair(s):

Karen Bakker - University of British Columbia 

Abstract(s):

10:00 AM   Author(s): *Michelle D. Daigle, PhD - University of British Columbia

 Abstract Title: The Gendered Politics of our Water Relations

10:20 AM   Author(s): *Dionne K. Zoanni - Montana State University

 Abstract Title: Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Water Governance on Fort Peck Indian Reservation, MT 

10:40 AM   Author(s): *Lori E.A. Bradford - University of Saskatchewan

Graham E.H. Strickert - School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan

Lalita Anne Bharadwaj - School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan

 Abstract Title: The Crow and the Pitcher and Indigenous Water Governance

11:00 AM   Author(s): *Jessica Hallenbeck - University of British Columbia

 Abstract Title: Fish Farms and Freeways: Dispossession from Water, Dispossession from Land

11:20 AM   Author(s): *Heather J. Dorries - Carleton University

 Abstract Title: Red Water: Considering the Setter-Colonial Dimensions of Urban Water Management

Session Description: As emblematized by the ongoing protests at Standing Rock, water is a foundational element—biophysical, epistemological, and spiritual—in Indigenous societies and lifeways. This crucial life source has come under increased threat due to the claimed necessity of extractivist development projects, as demonstrated in the marked increase in proposed pipeline construction, liquefied natural gas development, hydraulic fracturing, and bitumen crude oil production across Turtle Island. These extractivist projects threaten the land and waterways that sustain not only our own individual and collective lives, but also the lives of all of our relations: human and more-than-human. In the United States and Canada, the intensification of hydraulic fracturing has rapidly accelerated processes of accumulation by dispossession, in a context of "light touch" regulation in which new and significant breaches of Indigenous rights have emerged, and in a context in which threats to water are scantily monitored, under-regulated, and under-reported.

This panel brings together theorists of water politics, neoliberalization, and decolonization. We encourage a focus on the contemporary politics of resistance and resurgence by Indigenous peoples. We seek a diversity of perspectives that offer critical engagement with the ideas and practices of decolonization. Equally, we also welcome interventions that challenge decolonization as a framework for analyzing and interpreting water politics. We particularly welcome contributions focused on the water-energy nexus, oil and gas (especially hydraulic fracturing), and pipelines.


Alternative green practices 2

is scheduled on Sunday, 4/9/2017, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Gardner A, Sheraton, Third Floor 

Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Economic Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Julia Affolderbach - University of Hull

Christian Schulz - University of Luxembourg

Rob Krueger - Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Chair(s):

Julia Affolderbach - University of Hulu 

Abstract(s): 

10:00 AM   Author(s): *David Sauri - DEpartment de Geografia, UAB

*Maria Hernandez - Institute of Geography, University of Alicante 

 Abstract Title: Private and Citizen-led Approaches to Water Recycling : Contrasting Experiences in Mediterranean Spain

10:20 AM   Author(s): *Melinda Mihály - Leipzig University

 Abstract Title: Understanding social and solidarity economy initiatives in peripheralized rural areas - Cases from Hungary and (Eastern) Germany

10:40 AM   Author(s): *Sorin Cebotari - Babes-Bolyai University, Romania

 Abstract Title: Against all odds: Community owned renewable energy projects in North-Western Romania

11:00 AM   Author(s): *Michael T. Bacon - University of Virginia School of Architecture

 Abstract Title: Assemblages of Care: Community Ownership in Rural Scotland

11:20 AM   Author(s): *David C. Gibbs - University of Hull

 Abstract Title: Transition Regions and Alternative Green Economy Practices: A Research Agenda

Session Description: Debates around the capacity of and limits to the current capitalist mode of production have led many to reconceptualize economic models and to rethink how development occurs in practice. One widely promoted strategy within these debates is the 'green economy'.  The idea of a green economy is not new as illustrated by the spread of eco-industrial parks, green clusters, carbon finance and clean technologies. The green economy in practice is often reduced to financial and technological fixes through the diffusion, adoption and mainstreaming of green innovations and technologies or to new green products, services, and markets that sustain the growth imperative of the capitalist system.

This session explores alternative green economies by bringing together work on actually existing alternative practices, experiments and economies that break free from the described current paradigms of greening.  We are looking for examples of new, alternative, diverse, and socially just conceptions of the economy (in a wider sense) and economic development both in the global North and South.


Sustainable Urbanization: Challenges and Opportunities (3)

is scheduled on Sunday, 4/9/2017, from 2:00 PM - 3:40 PM in Columbus 2, Marriott, First Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Urban Geography Specialty Group

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Yuyu Zhou - Iowa State University

Wenze Yue - Zhejiang University

Bailang Yu - East China Normal University

Chair(s):

Wenze Yue - Zhejiang University

Abstract(s):

2:00 PM   Author(s): *Lina Liu - Lanzhou University

 Abstract Title: Factor Analysis on the Regional Inequality in Urban and Rural China's Household CO2 Emissions

2:20 PM   Author(s): *Chengshu Yang - East China Normal University

Bailang Yu - East China Normal University

Shunqiang Deng - ECNU

Xizhi Zhao - East China Normal University

Zuoqi Chen - East China Normal University

Kaifang Shi - East China Normal University

Jianping Wu - East China Normal University

 Abstract Title: The Nighttime Light Urban Development Curve: a spatial measurement of urbanization

2:40 PM   Author(s): *Kristine T Taniguchi - San Diego State University - University of California, Santa Barbara

Trent W. Biggs - San Diego State University

Eddy Langendoen - USDA ARS

Carlos Castillo - University of Cordoba (Spain), Córdoba

Napoleon Gudino - CICESE

Douglas Liden - US EPA

Ron Bingner - USDA ARS

Yongping Yuan - US EPA 

 Abstract Title: The application of 3-D Structure-from-Motion (SfM) techniques and CONCEPTS channel evolution model to simulate stream channel instability downstream of hardpoints in a rapidly urbanizing, semi-arid region of Tijuana, Mexico

3:00 PM   Author(s): Prasad Avinash Pathak, Dr. - Nalanda University

*Raja Sengupta - McGill University 

 Abstract Title: Urban Heat Island (UHI) Effect in the context of urban matrix: evaluation with ground-based, low cost sensors

3:20 PM   Author(s): *Jing Guo - Beijing Normal University

Qiang Li - Beijing Normal University

 Abstract Title: Equity of emergency shelter considering different populations based on 2SFCA


Session Description: In the past several decades, the world has experienced fast urbanization, and the urban growth is expected to continue in the next few decades. Urbanization modifies the Earth's terrestrial surface, and therefore, has profound impacts on agricultural practices, energy balance, and watershed hydrology from local to regional and even global scales and causes associated environmental problems. Urbanization will increase the challenges of environmental sustainability in terms of growing water, energy, and food demands. There is a growing need, from both the science and policy making communities, for information on urbanization and its environmental impacts from local to global scales. Improved understanding of urbanization can help us develop better practices in land use planning and management for sustainable urban development.

This session invites presentations focusing on challenges and opportunities in sustainable urbanization. The potential topics can include urbanization mapping and modeling, urban water and energy use, urban emissions, urban health, urban water-energy- food nexus, urban climate, urban ecosystem services, urban disaster assessment and management, and sustainable urban planning. We encourage studies that will advance our understanding of sustainable urban development. We would like to welcome any papers that showcase recent advances and original contributions in such topics.

 

Understanding Extreme Heat

is scheduled on Sunday, 4/9/2017, from 2:00 PM - 3:40 PM in Room 305, Hynes, Third Level

Sponsorship(s):

Hazards, Risks, and Disasters Specialty Group

Health and Medical Geography Specialty Group

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Paul Chakalian - Arizona State University

David M. Hondula - Arizona State University

Chair(s):

Paul Chakalian - Arizona State University 

Abstract(s): 

2:00 PM   Author(s): Babak J Fard - Northeastern University

*Mary Elizabeth Warner - Northeastern University

Auroop R Ganguly, Associate Professor - Northeastern University

Hanieh hassanzadeh, Associate Research Scientist - Northeastern University

 Abstract Title: Adaptation and Mitigation Strategies for Extreme Temperatures in the Town of Brookline

2:20 PM   Author(s): *Jihoon Jung - Florida State University

Christopher K Uejio - Florida State University

Chris Duclos - Florida Department of Health

Melissa Jordan - Florida Department of Health

 Abstract Title: Local Extreme Heat Vulnerability in Florida

2:40 PM   Author(s): *Paul Chakalian, MA - Arizona State University

*Elizabeth C. Kurtz, MA - Arizona State University

 Abstract Title: New Vulnerabilities in Power-on vs. Power-off Extreme Heat Events

3:00 PM   Author(s): *Arie Manangan - CDC 

 Abstract Title: Validation of a Climate and Health Vulnerability Assessment - Determining an Association Between a Heat Vulnerability Index and Actual Incidence of Heat-Related Illness in Georgia

3:20 PM   Author(s): *Zoe A. Hamstead - University At Buffalo

 Abstract Title: Collaborative climate action planning for addressing vulnerability to extreme heatSession Description: This session will focus primarily on issues concerning climate induced heat hazards with an emphasis on understanding vulnerability to extreme heat, the implications of extreme heat on health and well-being, exposure assessment, and projections of future impacts.

Climate and land use changes are driving an increase in the number of high-heat warnings around the country, and this trends are projected to continue into the future. This session will focus on understanding how extreme heat manifests in our environment, to what extent people are exposed to this hazard, and to what extent people are currently and will be in the future impacted by the associated risks.

The types of questions that could be addressed in this session can include but are not limited to: What creates variable extreme heat exposure? How do extreme heat hazards manifest in particular places (case studies)? Who is more and less vulnerable to extreme heat hazards and why? How will extreme heat hazards change in the future? How can we better understand the risks of extreme heat? and, How can policy makers and risk mangers more effectively mitigate the risks of extreme heat?

Decolonizing Water: Indigenous water politics, resource extraction, and settler colonialism

is scheduled on Sunday, 4/9/2017, from 2:00 PM - 3:40 PM in Room 310, Hynes, Third Level

Sponsorship(s):

Indigenous Peoples Specialty Group

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Karen Bakker - University of British Columbia

Glen Coulthard - University of British Columbia

Chair(s):

Karen Bakker - University of British Columbia

Abstract(s):

2:00 PM   Author(s): *Nicole J. Wilson - University of British Columbia

Nicole J. Wilson - IRES, UBC

 Abstract Title: 'Respecting water': Relationality and resisting the ontological violence of settler colonialism in water governance

2:20 PM   Author(s): *Alex Latta - Wilfrid Laurier University

 Abstract Title: Decolonizing Water Stewardship in the Northwest Territories 

2:40 PM   Author(s): *Graham EH Strickert - University of Saskatchewan

Lori E.A. Bradford - University of Saskatchewan

 Abstract Title: Blending Science, Traditional Knowledge and Art - A journey in decolonizing research.

3:00 PM   Author(s): *Karen Bakker, Professor - University of British Columbia

 Abstract Title: First in Time, but not First in Right: Decolonizing Indigenous Water Governance in British Columbia, Canada

Session Description: As emblematized by the ongoing protests at Standing Rock, water is a foundational element—biophysical, epistemological, and spiritual—in Indigenous societies and lifeways. This crucial life source has come under increased threat due to the claimed necessity of extractivist development projects, as demonstrated in the marked increase in proposed pipeline construction, liquefied natural gas development, hydraulic fracturing, and bitumen crude oil production across Turtle Island. These extractivist projects threaten the land and waterways that sustain not only our own individual and collective lives, but also the lives of all of our relations: human and more-than-human. In the United States and Canada, the intensification of hydraulic fracturing has rapidly accelerated processes of accumulation by dispossession, in a context of "light touch" regulation in which new and significant breaches of Indigenous rights have emerged, and in a context in which threats to water are scantily monitored, under-regulated, and under-reported.

This panel brings together theorists of water politics, neoliberalization, and decolonization. We encourage a focus on the contemporary politics of resistance and resurgence by Indigenous peoples. We seek a diversity of perspectives that offer critical engagement with the ideas and practices of decolonization. Equally, we also welcome interventions that challenge decolonization as a framework for analyzing and interpreting water politics. We particularly welcome contributions focused on the water-energy nexus, oil and gas (especially hydraulic fracturing), and pipelines.

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