4/7 Friday Sessions

Slow Violence and the Environment I

is scheduled on Friday, 4/7/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in Columbus 2, Marriott, First Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Political Geography Specialty Group

Human Dimensions of Global Change Specialty Group

Energy and Environment Specialty Group 

Organizer(s):

Ruth Trumble - University of Wisconsin - Madison

Shannon O'Lear - University of Kansas

Chair(s):

Ruth Trumble - University of Wisconsin - Madison

Abstract(s): 

8:00 AM   Author(s): *Shannon O'Lear, Ph.D. - University of Kansas

 Abstract Title: Climate Science and Slow Violence: Technoscientific narratives

8:20 AM   Author(s): *Shane Donnelly Hall - University of Oregon

 Abstract Title: Slow Violence, Climate Justice, and Migration: The Narratives of the "Human Face of Climate Change"

8:40 AM   Author(s): *Daniel Abrahams - University of South Carolina

 Abstract Title: Responding to the Climate-Conflict Nexus: An Investigation of Discourses, Policy, and Implementation 

9:00 AM   Author(s): *Hanne Svarstad - Oslo and Akershus University College

Tor A. Benjaminsen - Noragric, NMBU

 Abstract Title: A REDD Case in Tanzania: Slow Violence through Knowledge Claims, Concealed Practices and the Creation of a Success Story

9:20 AM   Discussant: Ruth Trumble - University of Wisconsin - Madison 

Discussant(s):

Ruth Trumble - University of Wisconsin - Madison 

Session Description: Rob Nixon's concept of slow violence continues to contribute to the ways in which geographers engage with space.  This session welcomes papers that engage slow violence with environmental issues (broadly defined) to extend the dialogue between slow violence and geographies that focus on the environment.


Hydroscapes I

is scheduled on Friday, 4/7/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in Room 108, Hynes, Plaza Level 

Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Michael Minn - Eastern Washington University

Chair(s):

Michael Minn - Eastern Washington University 

Abstract(s): 

8:00 AM   Author(s): *Karin Schauman - University of Illinois - Chicago

Nabil Nazha, PhD - University of Illinois at Chicago

 Abstract Title: Cities in the Name of Progress. The Construction of the Itaipu Hydroelectric Dam and Its Impact on the Production of Space at the Border Between Paraguay and Brazil (1960-2016)

8:20 AM   Author(s): *Sokvisal Kimsroy - Kent State University

 Abstract Title: Assessing the Impacts of a Hydropower Plant on the Livelihoods of Residents in Cambodia: The Case of the Sambor Project

8:40 AM   Author(s): *Mohammad Eskandari -

 Abstract Title: Fueling the Hydro-dream: Political Economy of Large Dams in Iran

9:00 AM   Author(s): *Synne Movik - Norwegian Institute for Water Research

Synne Movik, Dr - Norwegian Institute for Water Research

 Abstract Title: Shifting discourses on dams, development and donors: A longue durée perspective on Norwegian energy aid to Nepal and Tanzania

Session Description: In addition to being fundamental to biological and social life, water is also deeply tied to identities, meanings and power relations. These sessions will explore the myriad ways in which water shapes, and is shaped by, physical, political, economic and semiotic landscapes around the world.

Critical Geographies of Energy Infrastructure I: Governance and Justice

 is scheduled on Friday, 4/7/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in Constitution A, Sheraton, Second Floor

 Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Anthony Levenda - Arizona State University

Sarah E. Knuth - University of Michigan

Laura Tozer - University of Toronto

Chair(s):

Anthony Levenda - Arizona State University

Abstract(s):

8:00 AM   Author(s): *Carol Hunsberger - University of Western Ontario

 Abstract Title: Energy justice and Canada's National Energy Board: A critical analysis of the Line 9 pipeline decision

8:20 AM   Author(s): *Stephanie Pincetl, PhD - UCLA

 Abstract Title: Building Energy Policy; Lurching into the 21st Century

8:40 AM   Author(s): *Carlo E. Sica, MA - Syracuse University

 Abstract Title: Where's the "structure" in energy infrastructure?

9:00 AM   Author(s): *Hudson Spivey - UCLA 

 Abstract Title: From Energy Colony to Regional Revolt: Decentralized Networks of Power in Fukushima, Japan

9:20 AM   Discussant: Harriet Bulkeley - University of Durham

Discussant(s):

Harriet Bulkeley - University of Durham

Session Description: First of four sessions.

Today's interconnected energy crises - worsening climate change; battles between fossil interests and challengers in a volatile global economy; economic decline, austerity, and new energy poverty; and deeply unequal global access to the benefits of reliable and clean energy supply - command political and scholarly attention. In this period of instability and transformation, energy infrastructures in particular have become increasingly powerful objects as loci of emerging technological revolutions and industry restructurings, major targets and stakes in geopolitical conflicts, and symbols of alternate futures.

We argue that energy geographers are well positioned to analyze and critique these emerging energy challenges, and to help cultivate desirable energy futures. Geographic approaches offer unique insights into the spaces and politics of infrastructure (re)production, from the political ecologies of violent extraction and urban metabolism to political economic treatments of urban-regional infrastructure privatization and industrial change, socio-technical work on low-carbon transitions, and cultural and geo-humanities engagements with infrastructural materialities and meanings.

This paper session aims to generate discussions about the future of critical energy geographies. Accordingly, we seek papers that engage with energy infrastructures from various perspectives and that are capable of provoking intellectually and politically creative conversations across areas of geographical inquiry. We seek to take up the challenge of understanding energy as a "physical medium through which to tilt the balance of power and exert social control," (Calvert 2015), to emphasize the ethical implications of uneven energy infrastructure development (Huber 2015), and, taking the advice of anthropologists, to reflect upon what the role of energy, as a concept itself, does to our study of geography (Boyer 2014). We invite contributions that both engage in critique and/or move beyond it to envision and make possible productive, just, and "abundant futures" (Collard et al 2015).

All Things Nuclear in a Post-Fukushima Context: Geographical Perspectives - 1

is scheduled on Friday, 4/7/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in Vineyard, Marriott, Fourth Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Hazards, Risks, and Disasters Specialty Group

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Health and Medical Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Misa Yasumiishi - University at Buffalo

Marissa Z. Bell - University At Buffalo

Daisaku Yamamoto - Colgate University

Chair(s):

Daisaku Yamamoto - Colgate University

Abstract(s):

8:00 AM   Author(s): *Chris S. Renschler - University at Buffalo (SUNY)

 Abstract Title: Using Fallout Radionuclides and Models to Enhance Stakeholders' Capacities to Assess Management Strategies for Both: Soil & Water Conservation and Contaminated Soils

8:15 AM   Author(s): *Xi Gong - University of New Mexico

F. Benjamin Zhan - Texas State University

Yan Lin - University of New Mexico

 Abstract Title: Is Ionizing Radiation Near In the Vicinity of Nuclear Facilities Related to Low Birth Weight in Offspring

8:30 AM   Author(s): *Carolynne Hultquist - Pennsylvania State University

 Abstract Title: Radiation from Fukushima: Policy, Information, and Technology

8:45 AM   Author(s): *Misa Yasumiishi - University at Buffalo

 Abstract Title: Decoding Environmental Processes Using Soil Radioactivity Data for Environmental Decontamination and Recovery

9:00 AM   Author(s): *Hiroyuki KANEKO - Rikkyo University

 Abstract Title: Why People Continue to Consume Local Food?: Radioactive contamination and the use of resources.

9:15 AM   Discussant: Chris S. Renschler - University at Buffalo (SUNY)

Discussant(s):

Chris S. Renschler - University at Buffalo (SUNY)

 Session Description: The nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Japan in 2011 and the subsequent radioactive contamination in the region has impacted the ways in which we view and deal with nuclear power, radioactivity in the environment, and the complex assemblage of actors in the energy industry and communities. Five years after the incident, the concerns about the effects of the disaster persist and the new issues and challenges related to nuclear power and radioactivity continue to arise. This multiple-session series aims to provide an opportunity to share knowledge, experiences, and questions among researchers who have been engaging in a wide range of issues related to radioactivity, nuclear energy, nuclear accident/disaster, nuclear proliferation, and other relevant events and phenomena. Our paper sessions and panel discussion will address the following nuclear-energy related topics, not limited to the Fukushima region: isotope techniques in geography; environmental impacts; geographies of health, radiation, contamination and decontamination; social and community impacts and responses; social and economic impacts of power plant decommissioning; knowledge, expertise and information; sustainability and progress; demographics and migration; gender and diverse economies; reconstruction and governance; use of geospatial techniques; urban-centric challenges.

Slow Violence and the Environment II

is scheduled on Friday, 4/7/2017, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Columbus 2, Marriott, First Floor 

Sponsorship(s):

Political Geography Specialty Group

Human Dimensions of Global Change Specialty Group

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Ruth Trumble - University of Wisconsin - Madison

Shannon O'Lear - University of Kansas

Chair(s):

Shannon O'Lear - University of Kansas 

Abstract(s):

10:00 AM   Author(s): *Ruth Trumble - University of Wisconsin - Madison

 Abstract Title: The Past is Present: Intersections of slow violence and disaster recovery 

10:20 AM   Author(s): *Lauren Richter, M.A. - Northeastern University

 Abstract Title: Constructing Insignificance? Applying Racial Contract Theory to Regulatory Failure in Environmental Justice Communities

10:40 AM   Author(s): *Himanshu Burte - Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS), Mumbai

 Abstract Title: Tearing through the neighbourhood: conflicting temporalities of infrastructure, project and in/formal place

11:00 AM   Author(s): *Dawn Biehler - University of Maryland Baltimore County

 Abstract Title: Narratives of Infrastructure and Sanitary Collapse: Framing Environmental Injustice After Redlining in Baltimore, Maryland, USA

11:20 AM   Discussant: Shannon O'Lear - University of Kansas

Discussant(s):

Shannon O'Lear - University of Kansas

Hydroscapes II

is scheduled on Friday, 4/7/2017, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Room 108, Hynes, Plaza Level

Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Michael Minn - Eastern Washington University

 Chair(s):

Michael Minn - Eastern Washington University

Abstract(s):

10:00 AM   Author(s): *Martina Angela Caretta - West Virginia University

 Abstract Title: "You should have seen the green maize fields. It was wonderful". An analysis of the rhetoric behind the implementation of the New African Green Revolution through small scale irrigation.

10:20 AM   Author(s): *Hussein A. Amery - Colorado School of Mines

 Abstract Title: Expatriate Grievances and Water Security in the Arab Gulf

10:40 AM   Author(s): *Theresa Pendergrast - Cornell University

 Abstract Title: Discord, Dispossession, and Dairy: Water Governance and Social Change in Canterbury, New Zealand

11:00 AM   Author(s): *Katharine Bolton - University of Colorado Denver 

 Abstract Title: Water as a Transformative Lens for Post Mining Landscapes 

11:20 AM   Author(s): *Susanna Diller - University of New Mexico - Albuquerque, NM

 Abstract Title: Human Experience and Social Valuation of Fountain Spaces in Denver and Albuquerque

Session Description: In addition to being fundamental to biological and social life, water is also deeply tied to identities, meanings and power relations. These sessions will explore the myriad ways in which water shapes, and is shaped by, physical, political, economic and semiotic landscapes around the world.

Critical Geographies of Energy Infrastructure II: Spatial,Temporal, and Material Politics

is scheduled on Friday, 4/7/2017, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Constitution A, Sheraton, Second Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Anthony Levenda - Arizona State University

Ingrid Behrsin

Sarah E. Knuth - University of Michigan

Chair(s):

Laura Tozer - University of Toronto

Abstract(s):

10:00 AM   Author(s): *Gordon Walker - LANCASTER UNIVERSITY

Mette Kragh-Furbo - Lancaster University

 Abstract Title: Re-monetizing electricity (non)flows and commodifying (non)demand: the extending metrological regime of market-based grid balancing

10:20 AM   Author(s): *Carlo E. Sica, MA - Syracuse University 

 Abstract Title: Where's the "structure" in energy infrastructure?

10:40 AM   Author(s): *Conor Harrison - University of South Carolina

Jeff Popke, PhD - East Carolina University

 Abstract Title: Mining steam: The promise and peril of geothermal energy in the Caribbean energy transition

10:50 AM   Introduction: Jeff Popke - East Carolina University

Session Description: Second of four sessions.

Today's interconnected energy crises - worsening climate change; battles between fossil interests and challengers in a volatile global economy; economic decline, austerity, and new energy poverty; and deeply unequal global access to the benefits of reliable and clean energy supply - command political and scholarly attention. In this period of instability and transformation, energy infrastructures in particular have become increasingly powerful objects as loci of emerging technological revolutions and industry restructurings, major targets and stakes in geopolitical conflicts, and symbols of alternate futures.

We argue that energy geographers are well positioned to analyze and critique these emerging energy challenges, and to help cultivate desirable energy futures. Geographic approaches offer unique insights into the spaces and politics of infrastructure (re)production, from the political ecologies of violent extraction and urban metabolism to political economic treatments of urban-regional infrastructure privatization and industrial change, socio-technical work on low-carbon transitions, and cultural and geo-humanities engagements with infrastructural materialities and meanings.

This paper session aims to generate discussions about the future of critical energy geographies. Accordingly, we seek papers that engage with energy infrastructures from various perspectives and that are capable of provoking intellectually and politically creative conversations across areas of geographical inquiry. We seek to take up the challenge of understanding energy as a "physical medium through which to tilt the balance of power and exert social control," (Calvert 2015), to emphasize the ethical implications of uneven energy infrastructure development (Huber 2015), and, taking the advice of anthropologists, to reflect upon what the role of energy, as a concept itself, does to our study of geography (Boyer 2014). We invite contributions that both engage in critique and/or move beyond it to envision and make possible productive, just, and "abundant futures" (Collard et al 2015).

 

All Things Nuclear in a Post-Fukushima Context: Geographical Perspectives - 2

is scheduled on Friday, 4/7/2017, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Vineyard, Marriott, Fourth Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Hazards, Risks, and Disasters Specialty Group

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Water Resources Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Misa Yasumiishi - University at Buffalo

Marissa Z. Bell - University At Buffalo

Daisaku Yamamoto - Colgate University

 Chair(s):

Marissa Z. Bell - University At Buffalo 

Abstract(s):

10:00 AM   Author(s): *Takehito Noda - Ritsumeikan University 

 Abstract Title: Why did farmers who desired early restart farming reject the policy to decontaminate nuclear polluted farmland? A case study of Kawauchi Village, Fukushima

10:15 AM   Author(s): *Bien Xuan Do - Department of Geography, Graduate School of Letters, Hiroshima University, Japan

 Abstract Title: Factors that Influence Migration Location Choices in the Fukushima Nuclear Accident Displacement 

10:30 AM   Author(s): *Aleksandr Sklyar, PhD Candidate, Sociocultural Anthropology - University of Michigan 

 Abstract Title: Post-Fukushima Materially and Socially Permeable Homes

10:45 AM   Author(s): *David W. Edgington, Professor - University Of British Columbia

 Abstract Title: The Road Back: Arrangements for Recovery of Population and Jobs in the Futaba District of Fukushima Prefecture

11:00 AM   Author(s): *Mitsuo Yamakawa - Professor, Faculty of Economics, Teikyo University

 Abstract Title: great east japan earthquake/ nuclear disaster and fukushima urban area master plan 

11:15 AM   Discussant: Misa Yasumiishi - University at Buffalo

Discussant(s):

Misa Yasumiishi - University at Buffalo

Session Description: The nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Japan in 2011 and the subsequent radioactive contamination in the region has impacted the ways in which we view and deal with nuclear power, radioactivity in the environment, and the complex assemblage of actors in the energy industry and communities. Five years after the incident, the concerns about the effects of the disaster persist and the new issues and challenges related to nuclear power and radioactivity continue to arise. This multiple-session series aims to provide an opportunity to share knowledge, experiences, and questions among researchers who have been engaging in a wide range of issues related to radioactivity, nuclear energy, nuclear accident/disaster, nuclear proliferation, and other relevant events and phenomena. Our paper sessions and panel discussion will address the following nuclear-energy related topics, not limited to the Fukushima region: isotope techniques in geography; environmental impacts; geographies of health, radiation, contamination and decontamination; social and community impacts and responses; social and economic impacts of power plant decommissioning; knowledge, expertise and information; sustainability and progress; demographics and migration; gender and diverse economies; reconstruction and governance; use of geospatial techniques; urban-centric challenges.


All Things Nuclear in a Post-Fukushima Context: Geographical Perspectives - 3

is scheduled on Friday, 4/7/2017, from 1:20 PM - 3:00 PM in Vineyard, Marriott, Fourth Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Hazards, Risks, and Disasters Specialty Group

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Economic Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Misa Yasumiishi - University at Buffalo

Marissa Z. Bell - University At Buffalo

Daisaku Yamamoto - Colgate University

Chair(s):

Misa Yasumiishi - University at Buffalo

Abstract(s):

1:20 PM   Author(s): *Noritsugu Fujimoto, Professor - Toyo University

*Noritsugu Fujimoto, Visiting Professor - Fukushima University

 Abstract Title: Regional economic boom after the nuclear disaster: Political economy, governance and reconstruction policy in Fukushima

1:35 PM   Author(s): *Masayuki SETO - Fukushima University

Akira Takagi - Kumamoto Gakuen University

 Abstract Title: International transferring of disaster management knowledge

1:50 PM   Author(s): *Makoto Takahashi - University of Cambridge

 Abstract Title: Enacting Nuclear Expertise: a performative analysis of post-Fukushima workshops and exercises

2:05 PM   Author(s): *Alexander Michael Pustelnyk - Colgate University

 Abstract Title: The 'Nature' of Exclusion: Nuclear Natures in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone

2:20 PM   Author(s): Nathaniel Trumbull - Univ. of Connecticut

Oleg Bodrov - Green World 

 Abstract Title: Best Practices of Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning: International Lessons and Mitigating its Socio-Economic Impacts

2:35 PM   Discussant: Marissa Z. Bell - University At Buffalo

Discussant(s):

Marissa Z. Bell - University At Buffalo

Session Description: The nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Japan in 2011 and the subsequent radioactive contamination in the region has impacted the ways in which we view and deal with nuclear power, radioactivity in the environment, and the complex assemblage of actors in the energy industry and communities. Five years after the incident, the concerns about the effects of the disaster persist and the new issues and challenges related to nuclear power and radioactivity continue to arise. This multiple-session series aims to provide an opportunity to share knowledge, experiences, and questions among researchers who have been engaging in a wide range of issues related to radioactivity, nuclear energy, nuclear accident/disaster, nuclear proliferation, and other relevant events and phenomena. Our paper sessions and panel discussion will address the following nuclear-energy related topics, not limited to the Fukushima region: isotope techniques in geography; environmental impacts; geographies of health, radiation, contamination and decontamination; social and community impacts and responses; social and economic impacts of power plant decommissioning; knowledge, expertise and information; sustainability and progress; demographics and migration; gender and diverse economies; reconstruction and governance; use of geospatial techniques; urban-centric challenges.

The past, present, and future of environmental justice research: Introducing the Routledge Handbook of Environmental Justice

is scheduled on Friday, 4/7/2017, from 1:20 PM - 3:00 PM in Boylston, Marriott, First Floor 

Sponsorship(s):

Ethics, Justice, and Human Rights Specialty Group

Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Ryan Holifield - University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Gordon Walker - LANCASTER UNIVERSITY

Jayajit Chakraborty - University of Texas - El Paso

Chair(s):

Ryan Holifield - University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Panelist(s):

Jonathan K. London - ept of Human Ecology/ Community and Regional Development

Isabelle Anguelovski - Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

Juliana Maantay - Lehman College/CUNY

Rosie Day - University of Birmingham

Discussant(s):

Julian Agyeman - TUFTS UNIVERSITY

Gordon Walker - LANCASTER UNIVERSITY

Jayajit Chakraborty - University of Texas - El Paso

Ryan Holifield - University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

Laura Pulido - University of Oregon - Eugene, OR

Session Description: This panel discussion will introduce the new Routledge Handbook of Environmental Justice (to be published in 2017), which includes 51 chapters by over 90 authors from multiple disciplines and six continents. The Handbook, the first and most comprehensive resource of its kind, addresses key theories, methods, substantive issues, and geographical contexts for environmental justice research. Our invited panelists and discussants will use the occasion to reflect on the past, present, and future directions of the field, which will also be the focus of our general discussion. 

Critical Geographies of Energy Infrastructure III: Contested Energy Landscapes 

is scheduled on Friday, 4/7/2017, from 1:20 PM - 3:00 PM in Constitution A, Sheraton, Second Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group 

Organizer(s):

Anthony Levenda - Arizona State University

Ingrid Behrsin

Laura Tozer - University of Toronto

Chair(s):

Sarah E. Knuth - University of Michigan

Abstract(s):

1:20 PM   Author(s): *Kees Lokman - University of British Columbia

 Abstract Title: Critical Geographies of Energy Infrastructure: Power, Politics, and Possibilities

1:40 PM   Author(s): *Mumtaz Derya Tarhan - University of Toronto

 Abstract Title: Energy Democracy: A Critical Technology Studies Perspective

2:00 PM   Author(s): *Brent Sturlaugson, AIA, NCARB - University of Kentucky 

 Abstract Title: 'What You Don't See Matters': Supply Chain Capitalism and the Architecture of Production

2:20 PM   Author(s): *Kirby Calvert - University of Guelph

Kirsten Greer, Assistant Professor - Nipissing University

 Abstract Title: (Re-)Reading energy landscapes as recursive cartographies: a human-environment history of energy transitions in Bermuda

2:40 PM   Discussant: Matt Huber - Syracuse University

Discussant(s):

Matt Huber - Syracuse University 

Session Description: Session three of four.

Today's interconnected energy crises - worsening climate change; battles between fossil interests and challengers in a volatile global economy; economic decline, austerity, and new energy poverty; and deeply unequal global access to the benefits of reliable and clean energy supply - command political and scholarly attention. In this period of instability and transformation, energy infrastructures in particular have become increasingly powerful objects as loci of emerging technological revolutions and industry restructurings, major targets and stakes in geopolitical conflicts, and symbols of alternate futures.

We argue that energy geographers are well positioned to analyze and critique these emerging energy challenges, and to help cultivate desirable energy futures. Geographic approaches offer unique insights into the spaces and politics of infrastructure (re)production, from the political ecologies of violent extraction and urban metabolism to political economic treatments of urban-regional infrastructure privatization and industrial change, socio-technical work on low-carbon transitions, and cultural and geo-humanities engagements with infrastructural materialities and meanings.

This paper session aims to generate discussions about the future of critical energy geographies. Accordingly, we seek papers that engage with energy infrastructures from various perspectives and that are capable of provoking intellectually and politically creative conversations across areas of geographical inquiry. We seek to take up the challenge of understanding energy as a "physical medium through which to tilt the balance of power and exert social control," (Calvert 2015), to emphasize the ethical implications of uneven energy infrastructure development (Huber 2015), and, taking the advice of anthropologists, to reflect upon what the role of energy, as a concept itself, does to our study of geography (Boyer 2014). We invite contributions that both engage in critique and/or move beyond it to envision and make possible productive, just, and "abundant futures" (Collard et al 2015).


Critical Geographies of Energy 1: Space, Scale and Discourse in Post-Hydrocarbon Politics

is scheduled on Friday, 4/7/2017, from 1:20 PM - 3:00 PM in Boston University, Marriott, Third Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Ethics, Justice, and Human Rights Specialty Group

Human Dimensions of Global Change Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Ryan Maurice Katz-Rosene - University of Ottawa

Mia Renauld

Noel Healy - Dept Geography Salem State University

Chair(s):

Ryan Maurice Katz-Rosene - University of Ottawa 

Abstract(s):

1:20 PM   Introduction: Ryan Maurice Katz-Rosene - University of Ottawa 

1:25 PM   Author(s): *Sean F Kennedy - UCLA

 Abstract Title: "Alternative energy capital of the world"? Geographies of energy transition and governance in Los Angeles' urban periphery

1:45 PM   Author(s): *Danya Al-Saleh - University of Wisconsin

 Abstract Title: The engineering of energy infrastructures for a "post-hydrocarbon" Qatar

2:05 PM   Author(s): *Jessica Debski - Salem State University

 Abstract Title: Fossil Fuel Divestment: Implications for the Future of Sustainability Discourse and Action within Higher Education

2:25 PM   Author(s): *Ryan M Katz-Rosene, SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow - University of Ottawa 

 Abstract Title: Energizing 8.5 Billion: The Socio-Spatial Implications of Eco-Modernist and De-Growthist Energy Futures 

2:45 PM   Discussant: Noel Healy - Dept Geography Salem State University

Discussant(s):

Noel Healy - Dept Geography Salem State University 

Session Description: Whether it be to help mitigate climate change, to obtain national energy security, to stimulate growth in domestic industries, or to lift populations out of energy poverty, governments around the globe are actively involved in retooling, reregulating, rebranding and/or reinvesting in various energy infrastructures, all while the dominance of fossil fuels within the global economy appears to be under threat. Multi-scalar projects, plans, and regulatory structures have emerged in recent years to start instituting change in energy systems (or in some instances to maintain the status quo), begging us to question the various dimensions and spatial dynamics at play. Several schisms have showcased themselves as communities, megacities, larger regional jurisdictions and nation-states have moved forward in attempts to achieve energy plans and targets. Among such divisions are those between eco-modernist and de-growthist ideologies, urban and rural development, globalism and localism, and multinational companies and communities challenging the influence and impacts of petro-capitalism. Together, this series of papers seeks to address the emergent issues around energy from a critical geographical perspective, with attention to various themes such as energy security, energy justice, socio-technical transitions, infrastructure, and climate change.

Critical Geographies of Energy Infrastructure IV: Inequality, Violence and (Dis)Connection

is scheduled on Friday, 4/7/2017, from 3:20 PM - 5:00 PM in Constitution A, Sheraton, Second Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group 

Organizer(s):

Anthony Levenda - Arizona State University

Laura Tozer - University of Toronto

Sarah E. Knuth - University of Michigan 

Chair(s):

Ingrid Behrsin

Abstract(s):

3:20 PM   Author(s): *Mary Finley-Brook - University of Richmond 

 Abstract Title: Racial Violence and Deadly Energy in the Americas 

3:40 PM   Author(s): *Veronica Isabel Jacome - University of California, Berkeley

 Abstract Title: Access at the Fringe: precarity within electric services in Unguja, Tanzania 

4:00 PM   Author(s): *Sophie L.Van Neste - University of Montreal

 Abstract Title: Energy politics and the 'ferocious love for place': complex entanglements for activists against pipelines

4:20 PM   Discussant: Jennifer Baka - Pennsylvania State University

Discussant(s):

Jennifer Baka - Pennsylvania State University

Session Description: Today's interconnected energy crises - worsening climate change; battles between fossil interests and challengers in a volatile global economy; economic decline, austerity, and new energy poverty; and deeply unequal global access to the benefits of reliable and clean energy supply - command political and scholarly attention. In this period of instability and transformation, energy infrastructures in particular have become increasingly powerful objects as loci of emerging technological revolutions and industry restructurings, major targets and stakes in geopolitical conflicts, and symbols of alternate futures.

We argue that energy geographers are well positioned to analyze and critique these emerging energy challenges, and to help cultivate desirable energy futures. Geographic approaches offer unique insights into the spaces and politics of infrastructure (re)production, from the political ecologies of violent extraction and urban metabolism to political economic treatments of urban-regional infrastructure privatization and industrial change, socio-technical work on low-carbon transitions, and cultural and geo-humanities engagements with infrastructural materialities and meanings.

This paper session aims to generate discussions about the future of critical energy geographies. Accordingly, we seek papers that engage with energy infrastructures from various perspectives and that are capable of provoking intellectually and politically creative conversations across areas of geographical inquiry. We seek to take up the challenge of understanding energy as a "physical medium through which to tilt the balance of power and exert social control," (Calvert 2015), to emphasize the ethical implications of uneven energy infrastructure development (Huber 2015), and, taking the advice of anthropologists, to reflect upon what the role of energy, as a concept itself, does to our study of geography (Boyer 2014). We invite contributions that both engage in critique and/or move beyond it to envision and make possible productive, just, and "abundant futures" (Collard et al 2015).

Critical Geographies of Energy 2: Security and Power in Energy Infrastructure

is scheduled on Friday, 4/7/2017, from 3:20 PM - 5:00 PM in Boston University, Marriott, Third Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Ethics, Justice, and Human Rights Specialty Group

Human Dimensions of Global Change Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Ryan Maurice Katz-Rosene - University of Ottawa

Mia Renauld

Noel Healy - Dept Geography Salem State University

Chair(s):

Mia Renauld

Abstract(s):

3:20 PM   Introduction: Mia Renauld

3:25 PM   Author(s): Don Alexander, PhD, MCP, RPP - Vancouver Island University

 Abstract Title: The Political Economy of Energy Megaprojects: The Case of British Columbia, Canada

3:45 PM   Author(s): *Peter Forman - University of Durham 

 Abstract Title: Governing Gas: Ontological Projects of Security Governance 

4:05 PM   Author(s): *Yuwan Malakar - Energy and Poverty Research Group, UQ Energy Initiative, The University of Queensland, Australia

Chris Greig - Energy and Poverty Research Group, UQ Energy Initiative, The University of Queensland, Australia

Elske van de Fliert - Centre for Communication and Social Change, School of Communication and Arts, The University of Queensland, Australia 

 Abstract Title: Human Agency of Energy Poor: Exploring Structural Domination in Energy Practices

4:25 PM   Author(s): *Ioan M. Charnley-Parry, BSc, MSc - University of Central Lancashire

John Whitton - University of Central Lancashire

 Abstract Title: What's important to you? Engaging different social groups to understand social priorities and the local impacts of new energy infrastructure in Anglesey, North Wales.

4:45 PM   Discussant: Brandon Derman - University of Washington

Discussant(s):

Brandon Derman - University of Washington

Session Description: Whether it be to help mitigate climate change, to obtain national energy security, to stimulate growth in domestic industries, or to lift populations out of energy poverty, governments around the globe are actively involved in retooling, reregulating, rebranding and/or reinvesting in various energy infrastructures, all while the dominance of fossil fuels within the global economy appears to be under threat. Multi-scalar projects, plans, and regulatory structures have emerged in recent years to start instituting change in energy systems (or in some instances to maintain the status quo), begging us to question the various dimensions and spatial dynamics at play. Several schisms have showcased themselves as communities, megacities, larger regional jurisdictions and nation-states have moved forward in attempts to achieve energy plans and targets. Among such divisions are those between eco-modernist and de-growthist ideologies, urban and rural development, globalism and localism, and multinational companies and communities challenging the influence and impacts of petro-capitalism. Together, this series of papers seeks to address the emergent issues around energy from a critical geographical perspective, with attention to various themes such as energy security, energy justice, socio-technical transitions, infrastructure, and climate change.

All Things Nuclear in a Post-Fukushima Context: Geographical Perspectives - 4

is scheduled on Friday, 4/7/2017, from 3:20 PM - 5:00 PM in Vineyard, Marriott, Fourth Floor 

Sponsorship(s):

Hazards, Risks, and Disasters Specialty Group

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Economic Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Misa Yasumiishi - University at Buffalo

Marissa Z. Bell - University At Buffalo

Daisaku Yamamoto - Colgate University 

Chair(s):

Chris S. Renschler - University at Buffalo (SUNY)

Abstract(s):

3:20 PM   Author(s): Melissa Haller - UCLA

 Abstract Title: The End of the Nuclear Era: An Investigation of Nuclear Decommissioning and its Economic Impacts on US Counties

 3:35 PM   Author(s): *Jennifer Stromsten, MRP - Institute for Nuclear Host Communities

 Abstract Title: The Social and Economic Impacts of Nuclear Power Plant Closures

3:50 PM   Author(s): *Daisaku Yamamoto - Colgate University

Yumiko Yamamoto - Colgate University

Paul Plummer - University of Western Australia

 Abstract Title: What Does It Take for a Nuclear Host Community to Transition to a Sustainable Path?

4:05 PM   Author(s): *Yumiko Yamamoto - Colgate University

Daisaku Yamamoto - Colgate University

 Abstract Title: Women Cultivating Diverse Economies in a Nuclear Host Community: A Case Study of Kashiwazaki, Japan

4:20 PM   Discussant: Elicia Mayuri Cousins - Northeastern University - BOSTON, MA

 Discussant(s):

Elicia Mayuri Cousins - Northeastern University - BOSTON, MA

Session Description: The nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Japan in 2011 and the subsequent radioactive contamination in the region has impacted the ways in which we view and deal with nuclear power, radioactivity in the environment, and the complex assemblage of actors in the energy industry and communities. Five years after the incident, the concerns about the effects of the disaster persist and the new issues and challenges related to nuclear power and radioactivity continue to arise. This multiple-session series aims to provide an opportunity to share knowledge, experiences, and questions among researchers who have been engaging in a wide range of issues related to radioactivity, nuclear energy, nuclear accident/disaster, nuclear proliferation, and other relevant events and phenomena. Our paper sessions and panel discussion will address the following nuclear-energy related topics, not limited to the Fukushima region: isotope techniques in geography; environmental impacts; geographies of health, radiation, contamination and decontamination; social and community impacts and responses; social and economic impacts of power plant decommissioning; knowledge, expertise and information; sustainability and progress; demographics and migration; gender and diverse economies; reconstruction and governance; use of geospatial techniques; urban-centric challenges.

Legibility Acts and Climate Adaptation 3

is scheduled on Friday, 4/7/2017, from 5:20 PM - 7:00 PM in Northeastern, Marriott, Third Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Human Dimensions of Global Change Specialty Group

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Denielle Perry - University of Oregon

Chair(s):

Denielle Perry - University of Oregon

Abstract(s):

5:20 PM   Author(s): *Julia Smachylo, MSc, MUD - Harvard University

 Abstract Title: Private Forests: Incentive-based Conservation in Southern Ontario 

5:40 PM   Author(s): *Caleb Gallemore - Lafayette College

Kristjan Jespersen, Ph.D. - Copenhagen Busines School

 Abstract Title: Seeing Like a Standard: Sustainable Palm Oil and the Coasian Challenge

6:00 PM   Author(s): *Sunita P. Reddy, Ph.D. 

 Abstract Title: Regulating Biomass as Carbon Neutral in the Biofuels Energy Landscape

6:20 PM   Author(s): *Brian Pompeii - California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo 

 Abstract Title: Social Vulnerability to a Creeping Hazard: The Great California Drought in Tulare County, CA

6:40 PM   Discussant: Matthew Neil Fockler - Augustana College

Discussant(s):

Matthew Neil Fockler - Augustana College

Session Description: Discussant: Matthew Fockler, Augustana College

Sponsors: Cultural and Political Ecology, Water Resources, Climate, Human Dimensions of Global Change, Energy and Environment specialty groups

Creating adaptation policies to contend with the impacts of climate change on the environment (e.g. drought, flooding, and biodiversity loss) and accompanying social ramifications (e.g. migration, conflict, economic losses) will require state intervention (Henstra 2015). Christian Parenti's illuminating 2013 AAG lecture drew attention to the state's role in the climate crisis through territorial acts that make aspects of the environment legible to its citizens. Legibility is a state territorial act that involves abstracting natural resources from nature by surveying and cataloging them, establishing property rights to them, and ultimately managing them. Nearly four years on, we see evidence of these legibility acts in adaptation strategies. Responses to extreme climate impacts are taking shape in path-dependent infrastructure development "solutions," such as Jakarta's lofty plans for walling out rising seas (Colven, forthcoming) and California's schemes for raising dam heights (Perry and Praskievicz, forthcoming). Similarly, we see evidence of the state crafting new relationships with nature in an effort to contend with the climate crisis. Perhaps the most compelling example is California's recent law recognizing forests and meadows as water infrastructure. This cutting-edge adaptation policy recognizes the necessity of conserving and restoring watersheds for productivity and resilience in the face of climate change (AB 2480, 2016). In myriad other cases, however, states refrain from adopting adaptation policies for political reasons. For instance, harvesting rainwater as still illegal in some states due to competing water rights regimes (Meehan and Moore, 2014).

 As climate change compels the state's return to resource governance, understanding how legibility acts have been applied and managed can serve to promote better, more viable adaptation policies (Parenti, 2015). Examination of the Wise Use movement, for example, revealed that centralized state resource governance grounded in legibility acts can have positive ecological and social consequences (McCarthy, 2002). What other examples can be informative?  This session brings together papers that discuss ways in which the state has related to the environment through territorial acts of legibility. The session seeks to advance theoretical and empirical approaches that examine the benefits, trade-offs, and political and spatial dimensions of legibility acts to inform climate change adaptation policymaking. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

 •      The use of environmental knowledge in policymaking.

•      Historical cases of legibility-driven policy frameworks in resource conservation and extraction.

•      The identification and management of ecosystem services.

•      The explicit incorporation of "climate change" language in environmental policy.

•      Debates on public vs. private lands and conservation.

•      The role and rights of indigenous and local communities in environmental decision-making.

References:

A.B No. 2048. (2016). An act to add Section 108.5 to the Water Code, relating to water. State of California.

Colven, Emma (in preparation). "Understanding the Allure of Big Infrastructure: Jakarta's Great Garuda Sea Wall Project".

Henstra, D. (2015). The tools of climate adaptation policy: analysing instruments and instrument selection. Climate Policy, 1-26.

McCarthy, J. (2002). First World political ecology: lessons from the Wise Use movement. Environment and Planning A, 34(7), 1281-1302. http://doi.org/10.1068/a3526

Meehan, K.M. and Moore, A.W. (2014). Downspout politics, upstream conflict: formalizing rainwater harvesting in the United States.

Parenti, C. (2015). The 2013 ANTIPODE AAG Lecture The Environment Making State: Territory, Nature, and Value. Antipode, 47(4), 829-848. http://doi.org/10.1111/anti.12134

Perry, D.M. and Praskievicz, S.J. (2016) "A New Era of Reclamation? [Re]developing Water Storage in the U.S. West in the Context of Climate Change and Environmental Regulation", In review

Scott, J. (1998) Seeing Like a State: How Certain Schemes to Improve the Human Condition Have Failed. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Land Change 4: Dynamics of Systems 

is scheduled on Friday, 4/7/2017, from 5:20 PM - 7:00 PM in Arlington, Marriott, Third Floor 

Sponsorship(s):

Human Dimensions of Global Change Specialty Group

Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Richard J. Aspinall

Brian Michael Birchler

Kathryn Wenger

Chair(s):

Kathryn Wenger

Abstract(s):

5:20 PM   Author(s): *Kemen G Austin - Duke University

Aline Mosnier - International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

Johannes Pirker - International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

Ian McCallum - International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

Steffen Fritz - International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

Prasad Kasibhatla - Duke University 

 Abstract Title: Making the case for forest benchmarking in zero-deforestation commitments: the case of oil palm in Indonesia 

5:40 PM   Author(s): *Nicholas J. Cuba - Brown University

Ben Fash - Clark University

Anam Khan - Clark University

John Rogan - Clark University

  Abstract Title: Tracing Vulnerability to Environmental Impacts Downstream from Mining in Honduras

6:00 PM   Author(s): *Diya Paul - Department of Geography. Rutgers University

 Abstract Title: Unintended Wildlife Spaces in the Eastern Ghats, India 

6:20 PM   Author(s): *Brian Michael Birchler - Oklahoma State University

Jacqueline M. Vadjunec, PhD - Oklahoma State University

Todd Fagin, PhD - Oklahoma Biological Survey

 Abstract Title: Mapping vulnerability to hazards and the effects of technology on building socio-ecological resilience in America's Southern High Plains

6:40 PM   Author(s): *Kathryn Wenger - Oklahoma State University

Jacqueline Vadjunec, Associate Professor - Oklahoma State University

Todd Fagin - Oklahoma Natural Heritage Inventory/Oklahoma Biological Survey

 Abstract Title: Land-Use and Land-Cover Change (LULCC) in Union County, NM and Cimarron County, OK: A comparative study on center pivot irrigation (CPI) growth and factors influencing its use

Session Description: Part of the Land Systems Science Symposium

 

Critical Geographies of Energy 3: Energy Justice and Resistance

is scheduled on Friday, 4/7/2017, from 5:20 PM - 7:00 PM in Boston University, Marriott, Third Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Ethics, Justice, and Human Rights Specialty Group

Human Dimensions of Global Change Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Noel Healy - Dept Geography Salem State University

Ryan Maurice Katz-Rosene - University of Ottawa

Mia Renauld

Chair(s):

Marcos J. Luna - Salem State University

Abstract(s):

5:20 PM   Introduction: Marcos J. Luna - Salem State University

5:21 PM   Author(s): *Noel Healy, Dr. - Salem State University

 Abstract Title: Reconceptualizing Energy (In)Justice: Democratizing energy system transitions, divestment and a 'just transition'

5:41 PM   Author(s): *Brandon Barclay Derman, PhD - University of Illinois, Springfield

 Abstract Title: Emerging legal geographies: The Dakota Access pipeline conflict

6:01 PM   Author(s): *Carolyn Snell, Dr - The University of York

Mark Bevan, Dr - Centre for Housing Policy, University of York

Ross Gillard - Department of Social Policy, University of York

 Abstract Title: Justice, fuel poverty and vulnerable groups: a comparative analysis

6:21 PM   Author(s): *Mia Renauld - Northeastern University

 Abstract Title: Shaped by Chevron: Evolving Entanglements from a Company Town towards a Just Transition

6:41 PM   Discussant: Ryan Maurice Katz-Rosene - University of Ottawa

Discussant(s):

Ryan Maurice Katz-Rosene - University of Ottawa 

All Things Nuclear in a Post-Fukushima Context: Geographical Perspectives - Panel Discussion

is scheduled on Friday, 4/7/2017, from 5:20 PM - 7:00 PM in Vineyard, Marriott, Fourth Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Hazards, Risks, and Disasters Specialty Group

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Economic Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Misa Yasumiishi - University at Buffalo

Marissa Z. Bell - University At Buffalo 

Chair(s):

Daisaku Yamamoto - Colgate University

Introduction:

Daisaku Yamamoto - Colgate University

Panelist(s):

John R. Mullin - University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Mitsuo Yamakawa - Teikyo University

Chris S. Renschler - University at Buffalo (SUNY)

 Session Description: The nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Japan in 2011 and the subsequent radioactive contamination in the region has impacted the ways in which we view and deal with nuclear power, radioactivity in the environment, and the complex assemblage of actors in the energy industry and communities. Five years after the incident, the concerns about the effects of the disaster persist and the new issues and challenges related to nuclear power and radioactivity continue to arise. This multiple-session series aims to provide an opportunity to share knowledge, experiences, and questions among researchers who have been engaging in a wide range of issues related to radioactivity, nuclear energy, nuclear accident/disaster, nuclear proliferation, and other relevant events and phenomena. Our paper sessions and panel discussion will address the following nuclear-energy related topics, not limited to the Fukushima region: isotope techniques in geography; environmental impacts; geographies of health, radiation, contamination and decontamination; social and community impacts and responses; social and economic impacts of power plant decommissioning; knowledge, expertise and information; sustainability and progress; demographics and migration; gender and diverse economies; reconstruction and governance; use of geospatial techniques; urban-centric challenges


Energy and Environment Specialty Group Business Meeting

is scheduled on Friday, 4/7/2017, from 7:10 PM - 8:10 PM in Room 311, Hynes, Third Level

Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

AAG 

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