4/6 Thursday Sessions

Making a Resource I: Science and Legal Frameworks of Shale Fuels

is scheduled on Thursday, 4/6/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in Room 201, Hynes, Second Level

Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group 

Organizer(s):

Jennifer Baka - Pennsylvania State University

Elvin Delgado - Central Washington University

Arielle Hesse - Penn State

Chair(s):

Matthew Fry - University of North Texas

Abstract(s): 

8:00 AM   Author(s): *Kathryn Bills Walsh - Montana State University

Julia H. Haggerty, PhD - Montana State University 

 Abstract Title: Governing Unconventional Legacies: Lessons from the Coalbed Methane Boom in Wyoming 

8:20 AM   Author(s): *Kärg Kama - University of Oxford

 Abstract Title: Resource-making as Politics of Knowledge: Epistemic Struggles in European Shale Gas Development

8:40 AM   Author(s): *Eliot Tretter - University of Calgary

 Abstract Title: Fossilized Knowledges: The New Enclosures of the Necrosphere 

9:00 AM   Author(s): *Arielle Hesse - Penn State

Jennifer Baka - Penn State

Erika Weinthal - Duke University

Karen Bakker - University of British Columbia

 Abstract Title: Making science: How stakeholder coalitions frame scientific claims to influence federal regulation of hydraulic fracturing on federal and tribal lands in the United States

9:20 AM   Author(s): *Matthew Fry - University of North Texas

Christian Brannstrom - Texas A&M 

 Abstract Title: Experimental regulatory approaches for unconventional gas: the case of urban drilling and local government authority in Texas

Session Description: "Resources are not: they become." In only a few words Erich Zimmerman (1933) captures the objective of contemporary resource geography: to study how resources emerge from a multitude of forces that intersect at certain moments in particular places and across specific regions to produce goods and services for society. However, how these environmental, technological, legal, social, and political economic forces coalesce around shale fuel deposits has yet to be fully explored. Despite a decade of commercial scale production and a growing body of social science literature within cognate disciplines, to date, few geographers have extended a particularly geographic and empirical analysis of how such forces converge to make shale resources. In particular, few studies have examined the role of science, technology and legal frameworks in enabling (or constraining) the commodification of shale. The goals of this paper session are to address these research gaps by examining: 1) the ways in which shale deposits are territorialized and commodified; 2) how commodification processes differ across shale basins and/or from past instances of energy resource commodification; 3) how science and new technology contribute to making shale, including the role of reserve estimates, hydro-fracturing technology, waste production and disposal, and science communication; 4) how legal frameworks and emerging laws and regulations utilize scientific knowledge to enhance or limit shale commodification; 5) how commodification processes, laws, and science influence shale governance and territorializing processes; and 6) the political economic implications associated with the commodification of shale deposits.

 

Conservation Extraction Conundrum I

is scheduled on Thursday, 4/6/2017, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in Boston University, Marriott, Third Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Rural Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Timothy B. Norris - University of Miami

Francis Masse - York University

Devin Holterman - York University

Chair(s):

Timothy B. Norris - University of Miami

Abstract(s):

8:00 AM   Introduction: Timothy B. Norris - University of Miami

8:05 AM   Author(s): *Devin Holterman - York University

 Abstract Title: The Extractive Industries and Conservation: Questioning Trends in Corporate Social Responsibility

8:25 AM   Author(s): *Dave Knieter - West Virginia University

 Abstract Title: There for the Kill: An Analysis of Trophy Hunting, Neoliberal Conservation, and the Green Economy at Safari Club International's Annual Hunters' Convention

8:45 AM   Author(s): *Gabrielle A. Slowey, Dr. - York University/Dartmouth College

 Abstract Title: The calm before the storm: Ecological Knowledge and Caribou Conservation in the NWT, Canada

9:05 AM   Author(s): *Ryan D. Bergstrom, PhD - University of Minnesota Duluth

 Abstract Title: The Curious Case of Cuyuna: From Iron Ore Extraction to World Class Mountain Biking

9:25 AM   Discussant: Dianne E. Rocheleau - Clark University

Discussant(s):

Dianne E. Rocheleau - Clark University 

Session Description: Relationships between extraction and conservation actors are often strained with antagonisms rooted in deep and opposing ideological stances, yet in some cases mutually beneficial relationships exist between the two sectors. At the time of writing the "big three" global conservation organizations—the WWF, CI and the WCS—all have "partnerships" with multi-national extractive interests, for example. In addition, through the course of decades of neoliberal reform, conservation efforts are now explicitly organized around capital accumulation. Markets have emerged for biodiversity-based services and products such as eco-system services, species banking, tourism and beyond. In this context conservationists now see partnerships and/or relationships with extractive interests as practical paths forward to conserve flora, fauna, and habitats so that biodiversity and the so-called "ecosystem services" will be available to future generations. Whether these approaches will remedy environmental problems at a global scale is an open question, yet without doubt they function as accumulation strategies. Global investment hotspots now exist for both biodiversity conservation and extractive activities and some of these hotspots co-exist in shared geographical spaces. Yet how these two activities come together is often not explicitly explored in the literature on either conservation or resource extraction. Keeping in mind a broader understanding of what extraction might mean in the context of conservation, in this session we aim to explore the relationships between conservation and extraction in order to bring the two distinct conversations of accumulation together.


Making a Resource II: Political Economies of Shale Fuels

is scheduled on Thursday, 4/6/2017, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Room 201, Hynes, Second Level

Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Jennifer Baka - Pennsylvania State University

Elvin Delgado - Central Washington University

Arielle Hesse - Penn State

Chair(s):

Matthew Fry - University of North Texas

Abstract(s):

10:00 AM   Discussant: Jennifer Baka - Pennsylvania State University 

10:20 AM   Author(s): *Heather Plumridge Bedi, PhD - Dickinson College

 Abstract Title: Hydraulic Fracturing, Energy Independence, and the Politics of Energy Discourses

10:40 AM   Author(s): *Gretchen Leigh Sneegas - University of Georgia

 Abstract Title: Producing farmers, consuming expertise: Land grant colleges and the production of neoliberal environmentality in the context of shale gas development

11:00 AM   Author(s): *Elvin Delgado - Central Washington University

 Abstract Title: State, Community, and Energy Independence? Implications of Fracking Vaca Muerta in Northern Patagonia, Argentina

Discussant(s):

Jennifer Baka - Pennsylvania State University

Session Description: "Resources are not: they become." In only a few words Erich Zimmerman (1933) captures the objective of contemporary resource geography: to study how resources emerge from a multitude of forces that intersect at certain moments in particular places and across specific regions to produce goods and services for society. However, how these environmental, technological, legal, social, and political economic forces coalesce around shale fuel deposits has yet to be fully explored. Despite a decade of commercial scale production and a growing body of social science literature within cognate disciplines, to date, few geographers have extended a particularly geographic and empirical analysis of how such forces converge to make shale resources. In particular, few studies have examined the role of science, technology and legal frameworks in enabling (or constraining) the commodification of shale. The goal of this paper session is to address these research gaps by examining: 1) the ways in which shale deposits are territorialized and commodified; 2) how commodification processes differ across shale basins and/or from past instances of energy resource commodification; 3) how science and new technology contribute to making shale, including the role of reserve estimates, hydro-fracturing technology, waste production and disposal, and science communication; 4) how legal frameworks and emerging laws and regulations utilize scientific knowledge to enhance or limit shale commodification; 5) how commodification processes, laws, and science influence shale governance and territorializing processes; and 6) the political economic implications associated with the commodification of shale deposits.

Conservation Extraction Conundrum II

is scheduled on Thursday, 4/6/2017, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Boston University, Marriott, Third Floor 

Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Rural Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Timothy B. Norris - University of Miami

Francis Masse - York University

Devin Holterman - York University

Chair(s):

Francis Masse - York University

Abstract(s):

10:00 AM   Introduction: Francis Masse - York University

10:05 AM   Author(s): *Timothy B. Norris - University of Miami

 Abstract Title: Peru, Property and Persuasion: the evolution of legal frameworks for conservation and extraction in Peru.

10:25 AM   Author(s): *Forrest DeGroff - CCSF 

 Abstract Title: Is A Simple, Yet Comprehensive and Consistent Climate Change Metric For Carbon Possible?

10:45 AM   Author(s): *Kathleen McAfee - San Francisco State University

 Abstract Title: Big Conservation and Big Pollution: Allies in the Push for REDD+ Offsets in California's Climate Policy

11:05 AM   Discussant: Robert Fletcher - Wageningen University

Discussant(s):

Robert Fletcher - Wageningen University 

Session Description: Relationships between extraction and conservation actors are often strained with antagonisms rooted in deep and opposing ideological stances, yet in some cases mutually beneficial relationships exist between the two sectors. At the time of writing the "big three" global conservation organizations—the WWF, CI and the WCS—all have "partnerships" with multi-national extractive interests, for example. In addition, through the course of decades of neoliberal reform, conservation efforts are now explicitly organized around capital accumulation. Markets have emerged for biodiversity-based services and products such as eco-system services, species banking, tourism and beyond. In this context conservationists now see partnerships and/or relationships with extractive interests as practical paths forward to conserve flora, fauna, and habitats so that biodiversity and the so-called "ecosystem services" will be available to future generations. Whether these approaches will remedy environmental problems at a global scale is an open question, yet without doubt they function as accumulation strategies. Global investment hotspots now exist for both biodiversity conservation and extractive activities and some of these hotspots co-exist in shared geographical spaces. Yet how these two activities come together is often not explicitly explored in the literature on either conservation or resource extraction. Keeping in mind a broader understanding of what extraction might mean in the context of conservation, in this session we aim to explore the relationships between conservation and extraction in order to bring the two distinct conversations of accumulation together.

 

Sacrifice Zones 1: Evolution, Development, & Current Application

is scheduled on Thursday, 4/6/2017, from 1:20 PM - 3:00 PM in Beacon D, Sheraton, Third Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Political Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Alec Brownlow - DePaul University

Siri Veland - Brown University

Chair(s):

Alec Brownlow - DePaul University

Panelist(s):

Siri Veland - Brown University

Douglas L. Johnson - Clark University

Valerie Kuletz

Rebecca Scott - University of Missouri - Columbia

Shelby Doyle - Iowa State University

Session Description: The panel draws together a cross-disciplinary group of scholars whose respective and combined work has (re)introduced the concept of The Sacrifice Zone - that is, geographies of environmental and/or social annihilation in the name of some greater good - to the social and environmental sciences and to popular audiences nationally and internationally. Discussion will emphasize, inter alia, the following topics: the origins of the sacrifice zone, its symbolic transformation and politicization over the course of the 20th century, its application and meanings in various places and case studies.

Energy Transitions I 

is scheduled on Thursday, 4/6/2017, from 1:20 PM - 3:00 PM in Boston University, Marriott, Third Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Michael Minn - Eastern Washington University

Chair(s):

Michael Minn - Eastern Washington University

Abstract(s):

1:20 PM   Author(s): *Cyrus Samimi - University of Bayreuth

Harald Zandler - 

 Abstract Title: Renewable energy and energy consumption in the Eastern Pamirs

1:40 PM   Author(s): *Pankaj Lal - Montclair State University 

 Abstract Title: Exploring Place-Based Opportunities for Bioenergy Sustainability 

2:00 PM   Author(s): *William R Delgado - Graduate Student, University of Texas at Austin

 Abstract Title: Solar Energy for Desalinating Municipal Water for El Paso, Texas

2:20 PM   Author(s): *Melissa R. Allen, PhD - Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Amy N. Rose, PhD - Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Joshua R. New, PhD - Oak Ridge National Laboratory

OluFemi A. Omitaomu, PhD - Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Jiangye Yuan, PhD - Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Marcia L. Branstetter, PhD - Oak Ridge National Laboratory

 Abstract Title: Understanding the Relationships among City Microclimate, Morphology and Energy Use

Session Description: Energy transitions are inherently complex and prolonged affairs, and there are numerous unanswered questions about the timing and nature of the transition to whatever comes after the fossil fuel era. These questions cross disciplinary and epistemological lines, making them particularly suited to exploration from the perspectives of geography. These sessions present research related to transitions in energy sources and uses, along with the social, political and/or economic implications of those transitions.

 

Sacrifice Zones 2: Theoretical Framing & Critical Interrogation

is scheduled on Thursday, 4/6/2017, from 3:20 PM - 5:00 PM in Beacon D, Sheraton, Third Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Political Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Alec Brownlow - DePaul University

Siri Veland - Brown University 

Chair(s):

Alec Brownlow - DePaul University

Panelist(s):

Simon Dalby - Balsillie School of International Affairs

Matt Huber - Syracuse University

Don Mitchell - Syracuse University

Brian Nail - Florida State College at Jacksonville 

Session Description: The panel draws together a cross-disciplinary group of scholars whose respective and combined work assists in the deconstruction, critique, and deeper interpretation and assessment of the meaning and significance of the Sacrifice Zone and its discursive spread as an increasingly deployed and weaponized trope used to justify or resist spatial, environmental, and/or social annihilation around the world. The discussion draws together scholars of sacrifice, security, space, and citizenship (inter alia) to help situate the meaning and politics of the Sacrifice Zone as a central discourse in socio-environmental thinking and politics over the past several decades.

Energy Transitions II

is scheduled on Thursday, 4/6/2017, from 3:20 PM - 5:00 PM in Boston University, Marriott, Third Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Michael Minn - Eastern Washington University

Chair(s):

Michael Minn - Eastern Washington University

Abstract(s):

3:20 PM   Author(s): *Magdalena Fallde - Linköping University

 Abstract Title: Sustainable technologies as local place branding

3:40 PM   Author(s): *Olivier Labussiere - CNRS 

 Abstract Title: Capturing the past, making unconventional energy future: exploring coal bed methane in France (Lorraine)

4:00 PM   Author(s): *Eva Öller - Freie Universität Berlin

 Abstract Title: Reconsidering Germany's leadership role in the context of EU Renewable Energy Policy

4:20 PM   Author(s): *Hannah Lyons - Northeastern University

Jennie Stephens, PHD - Northeastern University

 Abstract Title: Redistributing the Power: Energy Democracy, Diversity, and Inclusion in the Renewable Energy Transition

4:40 PM   Author(s): *Juan Declet-Barreto - Union of Concerned Scientists

 Abstract Title: Opportunities and challenges for alignment between proponents of carbon markets and environmental justice in the Clean Power Plan

 Session Description: Energy transitions are inherently complex and prolonged affairs, and there are numerous unanswered questions about the timing and nature of the transition to whatever comes after the fossil fuel era. These questions cross disciplinary and epistemological lines, making them particularly suited to exploration from the perspectives of geography. These sessions present research related to transitions in energy sources and uses, along with the social, political and/or economic implications of those transitions.

Comments