4/5 Wednesday Sessions

Building blocks and values in infrastructure: understanding agency, normativity, directionality & change I. Embedded normativities

is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/5/2017, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Salon J, Marriott, Fourth Floor 

Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Ralitsa Hiteva - SPRU, University of Sussex

Katherine Lovell - University of Sussex

Mark Usher - University of Manchester

Chair(s):

Aad Correljé - Delft University of Technology

Abstract(s):

10:00 AM   Author(s): *Jenny McArthur - UCL STEaPP

 Abstract Title: Contested norms and agency in the governance of infrastructure: redefining transport in Auckland, New Zealand 

10:20 AM   Author(s): *Denver V. Nixon, PhD - University of Oxford

Tim Schwanen, PhD - University of Oxford 

 Abstract Title: Community-led Infrastructures: Grassroots walking and cycling innovations in London 

10:40 AM   Author(s): *Ralitsa Hiteva, Dr. - SPRU, University of Sussex

 Abstract Title: Hidden agencies of governance: intermediaries and infrastructure 

11:00 AM   Author(s): *Iain Soutar - University of Exeter

 Abstract Title: Understanding unwritten narratives of societal engagement in the UK energy system 

11:20 AM   Discussant: Aad Correljé - Delft University of Technology

Discussant(s):

Aad Correljé - Delft University of Technology

Session Description: This session seeks to examine agency, normativity and directionality in infrastructure, which are seen to be some of the building blocks of infrastructure governance and central characteristics of governance for system change. Specifically we invite papers under two complementary themes: 1)Infrastructure and Agency and 2)Normativity and Directionality of infrastructure.

We would like to invite papers discussing Infrastructure and Agency within a range of diverse approaches:  infrastructures as a vehicle for agency; considering ways of conceptualising agency within infrastructure and investigating processes through which agency and alternative forms of agency emerge: how and at what scales? Questions might also explore the role of agency on processes of value creation, capture and distribution, as well as transformation, within infrastructure.

Under the theme of Normativity and Directionality of Infrastructure we would like to invite papers unpacking the hidden and latent normativities in infrastructure; the drivers and processes of developing desirable outcomes; and the impact these have on the directionality of infrastructure governance (i.e. the societal objectives and long-term trends in what kind of infrastructure is being developed, who participates in decision making and development, and how; as well as the dominant values, expectations and purpose embedded in infrastructure). We also welcome papers exploring how  certain characteristics of governance may affect the directionality of infrastructure for system change (e.g. planning practices, contract forms, public-private partnerships etc.).

We are also keen to examine overlaps and conversations between the two themes. For example, considering agency and the normalising effects of infrastructure: how infrastructure provides underlying circuitry of society which can be repeatedly rewired in response to shifting norms and ideals, thus underpinning and shaping the normative and desirable. This is an opportunity, too, to recognise the powerful role of infrastructure in societal transformation and moves towards more sustainable and inclusive societies. This could take the form of exploring the relationship between material engagement and inclusivity in relation to different types of infrastructure. For example, how openings for inclusion (such as the birth of civil society movements) can be cultivated through the physical opening up of infrastructure. What competing normativities of inclusion emerge through those engagements and how are they negotiated in infrastructure governance? How do alignments of infrastructure normativities emerge and what impacts do they have on directionality of infrastructure? What processes, actors and scales (can) play an important role in the alignment and disjuncture of values, normativities and directionality in infrastructure? How do they contribute to the making and undoing of path dependencies, socio-technical transitions and system changes.


Building blocks and values in infrastructure: understanding agency, normativity, directionality & change II. Analytics and interventions

 

is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/5/2017, from 12:40 PM - 2:20 PM in Salon J, Marriott, Fourth Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group 

Organizer(s):

Ralitsa Hiteva - SPRU, University of Sussex

Katherine Lovell - University of Sussex

Markus M. Bugge - NIFU 

Chair(s):

Mark Usher - University of Manchester

Abstract(s):

12:40 PM   Author(s): *Janice Astbury, PhD - Durham University

Sam Matthew, BA - Harvard University

 Abstract Title: Co-designed and co-produced infrastructure that includes, empowers, flourishes and enchants

1:00 PM   Author(s): *Neil J. Carhart, EngD - University of Bristol

Alex D Marsh - University of Bristol

Colin A Taylor - University of Bristol

 Abstract Title: The Role of Agency in Infrastructure Resilience

1:20 PM   Author(s): *Katherine Lovell - University of Sussex

Ralitsa Hiteva - University of Sussex

 Abstract Title: Finding the Locus of Control: Politics of Scale and Directionality in Infrastructure Development

1:40 PM   Author(s): *Erin Pritchard - Liverpool hope university

 Abstract Title: Normalcy of disability in relation to public infrastructure

2:00 PM   Discussant: Ralitsa Hiteva - SPRU, University of Sussex

Discussant(s):

Ralitsa Hiteva - SPRU, University of Sussex 

Session Description: This session seeks to examine agency, normativity and directionality in infrastructure, which are seen to be some of the building blocks of infrastructure governance and central characteristics of governance for system change. Specifically we invite papers under two complementary themes: 1)Infrastructure and Agency and 2)Normativity and Directionality of infrastructure.

We would like to invite papers discussing Infrastructure and Agency within a range of diverse approaches:  infrastructures as a vehicle for agency; considering ways of conceptualising agency within infrastructure and investigating processes through which agency and alternative forms of agency emerge: how and at what scales? Questions might also explore the role of agency on processes of value creation, capture and distribution, as well as transformation, within infrastructure. 

Under the theme of Normativity and Directionality of Infrastructure we would like to invite papers unpacking the hidden and latent normativities in infrastructure; the drivers and processes of developing desirable outcomes; and the impact these have on the directionality of infrastructure governance (i.e. the societal objectives and long-term trends in what kind of infrastructure is being developed, who participates in decision making and development, and how; as well as the dominant values, expectations and purpose embedded in infrastructure). We also welcome papers exploring how  certain characteristics of governance may affect the directionality of infrastructure for system change (e.g. planning practices, contract forms, public-private partnerships etc.).

We are also keen to examine overlaps and conversations between the two themes. For example, considering agency and the normalising effects of infrastructure: how infrastructure provides underlying circuitry of society which can be repeatedly rewired in response to shifting norms and ideals, thus underpinning and shaping the normative and desirable. This is an opportunity, too, to recognise the powerful role of infrastructure in societal transformation and moves towards more sustainable and inclusive societies. This could take the form of exploring the relationship between material engagement and inclusivity in relation to different types of infrastructure. For example, how openings for inclusion (such as the birth of civil society movements) can be cultivated through the physical opening up of infrastructure. What competing normativities of inclusion emerge through those engagements and how are they negotiated in infrastructure governance? How do alignments of infrastructure normativities emerge and what impacts do they have on directionality of infrastructure? What processes, actors and scales (can) play an important role in the alignment and disjuncture of values, normativities and directionality in infrastructure? How do they contribute to the making and undoing of path dependencies, socio-technical transitions and system change?

Sustainable Urban Land Systems

is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/5/2017, from 2:40 PM - 4:20 PM in Arlington, Marriott, Third Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group

Human Dimensions of Global Change Specialty Group

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Richard J. Aspinall

V. Kelly Turner - Kent State University

Christopher Galletti - Dartmouth College

Chair(s):

Burak Guneralp - Texas A&M University 

Abstract(s):

2:40 PM   Author(s): *V. Kelly Turner - Kent State University

 Abstract Title: The Real Estate Rigidity Trap: Barriers and Solutions to Developing Sustainable Urban Land Systems 

3:00 PM   Author(s): Christopher S Galletti - Dartmouth College

 Abstract Title: Getting Down to the Nitty-Gritty: Using Earth Observation Platforms to Study Neighborhood-Scale Sustainable Urban Land Systems

3:20 PM   Author(s): *Guang Xing - Florida State University

Tingting Zhao - Florida State University

 Abstract Title: Simulation of sustainable urban development scenarios in metropolitan areas using cellular automata and multi-criteria evaluation: a case study of the Orlando metropolitan area 

3:40 PM   Author(s): *Brian Michael Napoletano - CIGA - UNAM

Jaime Panaque-Gálvez - CIGA - UNAM

Marcela Morales Magaña - ENES - UNAM

 Abstract Title: Land change in the urban periphery as examined through the lens of geographic rift: Preliminary findings from Morelia, Mexico

4:00 PM   Author(s): *Burak Guneralp - Texas A&M University

 Abstract Title: Urban futures and teleconnections

Session Description: Part of the Land Systems Science Symposium


Building blocks and values in infrastructure: understanding agency, normativity, directionality & change III. Imaginaries and anticipation

is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/5/2017, from 2:40 PM - 4:20 PM in Salon J, Marriott, Fourth Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Ralitsa Hiteva - SPRU, University of Sussex

Mark Usher - University of Manchester

Markus M. Bugge - NIFU

Chair(s):

Katherine Lovell - University of Sussex

 

Abstract(s):

 

2:40 PM   Author(s): *Chiara Farné Fratini - University of Sussex 

 Abstract Title: Making integrative imaginaries of water governance transitions visible: advancing nexus governance theorization for inclusive and deisrable path-creation

3:00 PM   Author(s): *Bipashyee Ghosh, Ms. - University of Sussex

Saurabh Arora - University of Sussex

 Abstract Title: Transformative Potential Of Smart Mobility Infrastructure In Smart City Kolkata: A Discourse Analysis For Future Urban Imaginaries In India

3:20 PM   Author(s): *Aad Correljé - Delft University of Technology

Eefje Cuppem - Delft University of Technology

Udo Pesch - Delft University of Technology

Behnam Taeby - Delft University of Technology 

 Abstract Title: Anticipating moral uncertainties in the innovation of infrastructures

3:40 PM   Author(s): *Andrew Donaldson - Newcastle University, UK 

 Abstract Title: Scaling anticipation: the operational and exceptional agencies of food infrastructure

4:00 PM   Author(s): *Tom Dolan - UCL

 Abstract Title: Can we Align Expectations (Desired Outcomes) with Infrastructure Decision Making  

Session Description: This session seeks to examine agency, normativity and directionality in infrastructure, which are seen to be some of the building blocks of infrastructure governance and central characteristics of governance for system change. Specifically we invite papers under two complementary themes: 1)Infrastructure and Agency and 2)Normativity and Directionality of infrastructure.

We would like to invite papers discussing Infrastructure and Agency within a range of diverse approaches:  infrastructures as a vehicle for agency; considering ways of conceptualising agency within infrastructure and investigating processes through which agency and alternative forms of agency emerge: how and at what scales? Questions might also explore the role of agency on processes of value creation, capture and distribution, as well as transformation, within infrastructure.

Under the theme of Normativity and Directionality of Infrastructure we would like to invite papers unpacking the hidden and latent normativities in infrastructure; the drivers and processes of developing desirable outcomes; and the impact these have on the directionality of infrastructure governance (i.e. the societal objectives and long-term trends in what kind of infrastructure is being developed, who participates in decision making and development, and how; as well as the dominant values, expectations and purpose embedded in infrastructure). We also welcome papers exploring how  certain characteristics of governance may affect the directionality of infrastructure for system change (e.g. planning practices, contract forms, public-private partnerships etc.).

We are also keen to examine overlaps and conversations between the two themes. For example, considering agency and the normalising effects of infrastructure: how infrastructure provides underlying circuitry of society which can be repeatedly rewired in response to shifting norms and ideals, thus underpinning and shaping the normative and desirable. This is an opportunity, too, to recognise the powerful role of infrastructure in societal transformation and moves towards more sustainable and inclusive societies. This could take the form of exploring the relationship between material engagement and inclusivity in relation to different types of infrastructure. For example, how openings for inclusion (such as the birth of civil society movements) can be cultivated through the physical opening up of infrastructure. What competing normativities of inclusion emerge through those engagements and how are they negotiated in infrastructure governance? How do alignments of infrastructure normativities emerge and what impacts do they have on directionality of infrastructure? What processes, actors and scales (can) play an important role in the alignment and disjuncture of values, normativities and directionality in infrastructure? How do they contribute to the making and undoing of path dependencies, socio-technical transitions and system change?

Social Geographies of Wind Energy Development

 

is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/5/2017, from 4:40 PM - 6:20 PM in Columbus 1, Marriott, First Floor

Sponsorship(s):

Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Graduate Student Affinity Group

Rural Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):

Chad Walker - Western University

Jamie Baxter - University Of Western Ontario 

Chair(s):

Jamie Baxter - University Of Western Ontario

Abstract(s):

4:40 PM   Author(s): *Jamie Baxter - University Of Western Ontario

Chad Walker - University of Western Ontario

 Abstract Title: Method sequence and dominance in mixed-method research: An empirical investigation using the social dynamics of wind energy literature

5:00 PM   Author(s): *Nicholas Matthew John Mercer, Ba, MA - University of Waterloo

Gabriela Sabau, BA, PhD - School of Science and Environment, Grenfell Campus: Memorial University of Newfoundland

Andreas Klinke, BA, MA, PhD - Environmental Policy Institute, Grenfell Campus: Memorial University of Newfoundland

 Abstract Title: "Wind Energy is not and Issue for Government"" Barriers to Wind Energy Development, A Case Study of Newfoundland and Labrador

5:20 PM   Author(s): *Leilane Oliveira Chaves - Federal University of Ceara

 Abstract Title: Impacts of wind power on the Cumbe cummunity, northeastern Brazil

5:40 PM   Author(s): *Sarah Catherine Klain, PhD - Oregon State University

Terre Satterfield, PhD - University of British Columbia

Suzanne MacDonald, MA - Island Institute

Kai M.A. Chan, PhD - University of British Columbia

 Abstract Title: Will communities "open-up" to offshore wind? Lessons learned from New England Islands

6:00 PM   Author(s): *Chad Walker - Western University

Jamie Baxter, PhD - Western University

 Abstract Title: "It's easy to throw rocks at a corporation": wind energy development and distributive justice in Canada

Session Description: In efforts to mitigate the effects of climate change, increase energy sovereignty and build green economies, governments around the world have turned to renewable energy in recent years. Despite some inherent advantages of wind energy over more traditional sources, there has been growing 'resistance movements', particularly in rural communities facing potential development (Baxter et al., 2013). These localized opposition groups contrast public opinion polling which has shown very high levels of support for wind energy development- a phenomenon Bell et al. (2005) deemed the 'Social Gap'. This paradox between public support and local opposition was originally blamed on selfish, NIMBY (Not In My Backyard) motivations (Wolsink, 2000)- though more contemporary research has found more nuanced and context-specific explanations of resistance (Devine-Wright, 2005; Ellis et al., 2007; Walker et al., 2014).

This session invites papers from all social scientists looking at the social dynamics and challenges of wind energy developments. We are particularly interested in speakers whose research sits within the intersection of energy policy and the local realities of wind energy in the developed world.  The session is also open to researchers employing a wide range of approaches including but not limited to interviews and focus groups, mixed methods, discourse analysis, and quantitative analyses.

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