AAG Sponsored Sessions

EESG SPONSORED SESSIONS at the Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers


April 8-12, Tampa, Florida


Plenary Lecture

The Energy and Environment Specialty Group Plenary Lecture: "The Ocean Grab: Extractive Capital in the Deep Blue Sea" Dr. Anna Zalik.

Abstract:

The ongoing territorialization of marine space is central to the securitization – financial and military – of the offshore oil and gas industry. Drawing from research concerning extractive enclosures in three ocean spaces, this presentation explores the capital configurations driving a 21st century geopolitics of deep sea energy.


Business Meeting

The Energy and Environment Specialty Group Business Meeting


Paper Session

Title: Energy Mapping and Modeling for Sustainable Urban Systems

Organizers:

Kassie Hauser-Ernst (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) - hauserkm [at] ornl [dot] gov

Abstract:

Demands on global energy services evolve as migration rates and natural population growth overwhelm the provision of basic urban services. Energy, housing, water supply and sanitation infrastructure, and transport services are the key sustainability challenges to accommodate billions of urban dwellers in decades to come.  Papers in this session will focus on mapping and modeling energy systems for more reliable, resilient, and efficient urban services in view of future changes in population, environment, technologies, and climate. Implications for advances in policy and planning particularly within developing countries will be discussed whenever possible.


Paper Session

Title: Operationalizing the geo-energy space

Organizers:

Stefan Bouzarovski (University of Manchester)

Nazmiye Balta-Ozkan (University of Westminster)

Abstract:

Recent years have seen a resurgence of efforts to provide novel perspectives on the ways in which nature and society are interlinked via multiple and vibrant materialities (Bennett 2010). The notion of the 'geo-social' has been used to explore some of the connections that can be identified in this context, emphasizing the need for a new politics of responsibility and justice. At the same time, the emergence of 'energy geographies' as a distinct disciplinary field is helping foreground new explanations of the hydrocarbon circulations and consumption practices that underpin planetary challenges such as climate change and resource scarcity.  

In this session, we hope to connect these two distinct developments in order to scrutinize the materially contingent nature of contemporary circulations and assemblages in the energy domain. Following on from Mañé Estrada (2006) we use the notion of 'geo-energy space' to interrogate the spatial and territorial embeddedness of energy flows. While Mañé Estrada's original conceptualization primarily refers to large-scale geopolitical relations, this session aims to extend the idea to a wider range of spatial scales and material sites, so as to highlight the diverse ways in which anthropogenic energy flows are both predicated by, and themselves shape, the geophysical environment. 

Papers in the session can include, but are not limited to: 

  • Energy landscapes: using the framework to explain relations beyond its conventional origins – in spaces such as the home, community or trans-national organizations;
  • Low-carbon technologies: how do differences between, for example, urban and rural locations, account for different social practices and patterns of energy use (both on the supply side – e.g. microgeneration and off-grid communities – and in terms of demand: heat pumps, electric vehicles etc.);
  • Energy infrastructure: what is the agency of non-human actors in shaping the evolution of current patterns of energy delivery, as well as new developments such as unconventional oil and gas exploitation?

Contributions from across the discipline are welcome: We aim to open the path for the exchange of insights and discussions between different fields of study. The deadline for submitting abstracts (in line with the AAG's guidelines, see http://www.aag.org/cs/annualmeeting/call_for_papers/abstract_guidelines) is the 15th of October 2013.  Please send abstracts to stefan.bouzarovski [at] manchester [dot] ac [dot] uk and n.ozkan [at] psi [dot] org [dot] uk.


Paper Session

Title: Energy and the Socioecological Production of Space

Organizers:

Matt Huber (Syracuse University)

Saska Petrova (University of Manchester)

Abstract:

Energy is often talked about in explicitly geographical terms. Most notably, the language of geopolitics elevates oil resources as a *classic *case of a strategic object, fixed in particular spaces that becomes an object of conflict. Yet, in this narrative space is treated as a passive backdrop in the grand geopolitical struggle between states. Geographers (see, e.g., Calvert and Simandan 2010; Bridge et al. 2013) are beginning to think more expansively about the ways in which the social relations of energy production, distribution, and consumption are constitutive of various kinds of spatialities (e.g., extractive enclaves, infrastructural networks, urban spatial form). An implicit insight from this new research is that energy is central to the social production of space. In the wake of Henri Lefebvre’s work of that title – and critical theorizations of space from David Harvey to Doreen Massey – understanding space as a social product has become a truism in critical human geography. Yet, this is not a purely “social” or “human” story, and we rarely think of the ways in which resources, energy and nonhuman actors are co-constitutive in this “production”; making it a socioecological production of space, rather than simply social production.  The purpose of this Call for Papers is to bring together critical geographers to consider the ways in which energy is central in the socioecological production of space.

Questions addressed in the session include:

  • Are social struggles over space also struggles over energy (and vice versa)?
  • What alternative spatial imaginaries are articulated by various forms of global resistance to fossil fuel development?
  • What is the role of energy in classical geopolitical imaginaries?
  • How do modes of energy consumption and distribution become “locked in” to the built environment and fixed capital formation?
  • How do modes of energy production necessitate different forms of land-use patterns and spatialities of extraction?
  • How can we conceptualize ‘community’, ‘commons’ and ‘communal’ in relation to issues of energy demand and consumption?
  • What is the relationship between networks of energy distribution and political contestation?

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Energy localism
  • Energy and place attachment
  • Energy and urban spatialities
  • Energy and nationalism
  • Energy and citizenship
  • Energy and globalization
  • The energy commons
  • Energy and the politics of scale

Abstracts of no more than 250 words should be sent to saska.petrova@manchester.ac.uk and mthuber [at] maxwell [dot] syr [dot] edu no later than the 20th of October 2013.


Paper Session

Title: Geographic Perspectives on Wind Energy

Organizers:

Carol Atkinson-Palombo - University of Connecticut - carol.atkinson-palombo [at] uconn [dot] edu

Jamie Baxter – Western University – jamie.baxter [at] uwo [dot] ca

Abstract:

As the environmental and economic imperatives for transitions to renewable forms of electricity production have taken a firm hold over global energy policy in recent years, attention has turned to the issue of how best to implement renewable energy strategies; ones that entail landscape changes that are sometimes controversial at the local level.  Policy in this context can be very dynamic, as governments, developers and communities continue to adjust to the technical, social and political transformations involved.  For example, while for some local residents wind turbines have transformed mostly rural spaces into new sources of community pride, for others turbines have generated stigma and evoke concerns about a range of negative impacts.  A substantial literature, much of it from geographers, has emerged to document and explain the social implications of these transitions including thorough critiques of NIMBY and greater attention to issues of environmental/social justice, siting procedural issues, and the distribution of costs and benefits at various scales.  The purpose of this special session is to continue to explore these changing landscapes – physical, social, political, policy – from various geographical perspectives.

Process

1)   Email your abstract to the session organizers.

2)   We will contact you if the abstract is approved for the session(s).

3)   Submit your abstract using the AAG’s online system<http://www.aag.org/cs/registrationverification> (you register for the AAG Meeting at this time).

4)   Send us the PIN number of your abstract after you have submitted it.

Abstract deadline

Nov 25 (the AAG deadline for a session is Dec 3)

You benefit from a reduced registration fee if you register for the conference prior to Oct 23 (you can submit your abstract later).


Paper Session

Title: Networks of environmental governance

Abstract:

Environmental governance is marked by the participation of a constellation of actors -- including various levels of the state, communities, businesses, and NGOs -- in the production of knowledge, decision making, and outcomes (Lemos and Agrawal, 2006). With the rise of the network society (Castells, 2000), environmental governance has transcended traditional boundaries and divides. For instance, social media tools such as Google Crisis Response are now being used to create a post-disaster infrastructure of relief. At the same time, more conventional forms of governance are deeply rooted in history and continue to persist, sometimes evolving into more complex and entangled beings. The ways in which socio-environmental actors are networked and institutionalized have critical implications for policy and action.

This session aims to bring together theoretical, empirical, and methodological work on the networks that constitute various modes of environmental governance. Topics may include but are not limited to the following:

  • New and old architectures of environmental networks (e.g. transnational, hierarchical, decentralized, polycentric, multi-scalar)
  • Historical legacies and the evolution of environmental networks
  • Methods for disentangling complex environmental systems
  • Inter-network interactions, or the lack thereof (connections and silos)
  • Formal and informal networks, and modes of institutionalization
  • The implications of complex systems of environmental management on policy, action, justice, and citizenship

Please send an abstract of no more than 250 words to Anita Milman (mailman [at] eco [dot] umass [dot] edu) and Deborah Cheng (dcheng [at] ioes [dot] ucla [dot] edu) by November 15th.


Panel Session

Title: Teaching Energy Geographies

Abstract:

We are writing to invite you to join our panel, "Teaching Energy Geographies," at the Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers in April 2014.  Panel participants will be asked to present a teaching intervention - a unit, concept, reading, or other classroom activity - that they have found effective in teaching energy geography concepts or theories in their classes.  We plan to collect such teaching interventions to share them more broadly in one of two ways: 1) as articles in a proposed special issue for The Journal of Geography in Higher Education; and/or 2) as videos of the panel, which we would post (along with any materials you might use for teaching your intervention such as handouts, powerpoints, etc.), on the AAG's Energy and Environment Specialty Group / RGS Energy Geography webpages.

After each panelist presents their teaching intervention, we will have a discussion among panelists that address the following questions:

1. Developing innovative energy syllabi

-       How do we teach energy related issues and for what purposes?

-       How can we use active and collaborative teaching methods in teaching about energy?

2. The Demand for Learning Energy Issues

-       What is the demand for energy related courses?

-       What level student are these courses most appropriate for?

If you are interested in participating, please send us an email by November 15.

Ultimately we will want a brief outline of your energy teaching module, intervention, or activity and for you to let us know whether you would be interested in also having your intervention be a part of either or both of the two collection ideas.

Please send these, as well as any questions or comments, to one of Autumn Thoyre (author [at] email [dot] unc [dot] edu), Conor Harrison (conorh [at] email [dot] unc [dot] edu) or Saska Petrova (saska.petrova [at] manchester [dot] ac [dot] uk).  We look forward to hearing from you!


Paper Session

Title: Low-Carbon Innovation Geographies: The Real and the Imagined

Organizers: 

Peter Kedron, Ryerson University, pkedron [at] ryerson [dot] ca

Abigail Martin, University of California Berkeley, abigailmartin [at] berkeley [dot] edu

If you are interested in participating, please send a 250-300 word abstract to both organizers (abigailmartin@berkeley.edu; pkedron@ryerson.ca) by November 26, 2013. Feel free to contact either organizer with questions.

Session Abstract

Governments increasingly turn to innovation policy to promote renewable energy as a technological fix for climate change, a strategy for transitioning to a “greener” economy, and a vehicle for ‘low carbon growth’. Current efforts to develop and scale low-carbon energy technologies indicate multiple potential geographical futures are in play (Bridget et al., 2013). This raises the question of how innovation, as a state project, is imagined. Moreover, given that innovation projects for low carbon renewables have already begun to shift more traditional value-chain activities into new geographic spaces, research must also address the material reconfigurations of socio-ecological trajectories. This session provides an opportunity to consider the real and imagined geographies emerging from efforts to develop low-carbon / renewable energy technologies. We seek to put a range of theoretical / methodological approaches into conversation, and invite research that addresses the following themes:

(1) The role of technological change in encouraging / realizing expanded use of particular energy systems, including but not limited to: Advances in photovoltaics; Cellulosic feedstocks and technologies for biofuel / ‘bioeconomy’; Improvements in wind turbine motor design; Electric vehicle battery design and charging systems

(2) Circulation of strategic policy visions that frame technological challenges and solutions in renewable/low-carbon energy

(3) Convergence / divergence of regional expertise (e.g. innovation clusters) in pursuing innovation

(4) Spatial distribution of knowledge, innovation and production in low-carbon technological development

(5) The path-dependent and path-shaping nature of emerging innovation geographies


Panel Session

Title: Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples Panel Discussion: Environmental Justice and the Water-Energy Nexus

Co-Chairs:

Emma S. Norman, Department of Environment and Energy Policy, Michigan Technological University

Douglas Hermann, Senior Geographer, Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian

Abstract:

This panel will examine the impacts of global climate change on Indigenous Peoples, and the strategies that Indigenous Peoples and their allies are employing to address these changes. The panelists will discuss how shifting ecological patterns related to Global Climate Change are both environmental justice and social justice issues, particularly in relation to water quality and water availability.

Through specific examples, the panelists will highlight how Indigenous Peoples are employing innovative strategies such as building coalitions, jumping scales, and mobilizing treaty rights to address these pressing issues. Finally, by framing the issues as a water-energy nexus, the panelists strategize about entry points into the Global Climate Change discussion by employing alternative energy and environmental policy initiatives that directly address environmental justice of Indigenous Peoples.


Paper Session:

Title: Fracking Landscapes: Examinations of Governance, Identity, and Resistance

Organizers:

Sarah T. Romano, Political Science and International Affairs, University of Northern Colorado

Shaunna Barnhart, Environmental Science, Allegheny College

Abstract:

Oil and gas extraction continues at a frenetic pace despite the significant controversy generated by new technologies in hydraulic fracturing.  As “fracking” expands across both urban and rural landscapes in the United States, so do new potential sites of resistance and contentious politics as residents confront threats to their air, water, and land.  This session aims to expand our understanding of the dynamics of governance, identity, and resistance that characterize the socio-ecological spaces of fracking sites.  How does the promotion of and resistance to hydraulic fracturing reveal both continuities and ruptures in regard to ecological governance at local or broader scales?  How does hydraulic fracturing as a mode of resource extraction reveal shifting and/or reproduced relations of power (along racial, ethnic, class, or gender lines; and/or across public-private or urban-rural divides)?  How do specific socio-ecological landscapes (like university campuses, privately-owned farms, and public spaces) influence the nature of fracking governance and resistance?

We expect papers in this session to examine diverse instances of and responses to hydraulic fracturing. Paper topics may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Comparisons of the ecological, social and political contours of hydraulic fracturing in rural, semi-rural, and urban contexts
  • Examinations of “new frontiers” in fracking, like university campuses
  • Analysis of how risks are defined, redefined, contested, and experienced in fracking communities and industries
  • Comparisons of land tenure systems and the fracking experience (i.e. split estates versus leasing mineral rights)\ 
  • Shifting identities and/or changing subjectivities in fracking impacted areas
  • Application of visualization techniques to investigate socio-ecological patterns in fracking 

 

Paper Session: 

Title: Measurement and modeling of environmental degradation and pollution

Organizers:

Thorpe, A K, Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara, akthorpe [at] grog [dot] ucsb [dot] edu 

Abstract:

With the increasing availability and breadth of scientific data, geospatial analysis offers even greater potential to measure and model environmental degradation and pollution at local, regional, and global scales. This session focuses on the use of in situ, remotely sensed, and inventory data to visualize and quantify both measured and modeled results. Relevant topics include but are not limited to terrestrial/marine/atmospheric pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, climate change, and land cover change related to environmental degradation.

If you are interested in presenting a paper in this session, please submit your abstract through the AAG website and send your personal identification number (PIN), paper title, and abstract to akthorpe [at] grog [dot] ucsb [dot] edu by November 29, 2013. Please let me know if you have questions.

 

Paper Session: 

Title: Theorizing Neoliberalism from the Inside Out

Organizers:

Carlo E. Sica (cesica [at] syr [dot] edu) 

John Lauermann (jlauermann [at] clarku [dot] edu)

Abstract:

In the wake of the global financial crisis, many signaled a fundamental shift in neoliberal politics. While for some it was 'dead but dominant'(Smith, 2009), for others it was entering a 'post' (Peck et al., 2009) or increasingly "variegated" form (Brenner et al., 2010). The consensus seemed to be that the neoliberalism has qualitatively changed from what it was before the crisis. Simultaneously, the resurgence of austerity politics and deeply embedded persistence of neoliberal policy projects indicates a pressing need to come to terms - theoretically and empirically - with the types of neoliberalisms which lie ahead. The hope of this session is to provide a space for a sustained critique of neoliberal practice based on the increasing contradiction between fragmented neoliberal strategies and their original political logics. Critiques of neoliberalism often entail case studies that exhibit instances where further injustice and inequality have resulted from the rollback of government and the rollout of privatization, foreign direct investment, and market-oriented governance. Building on this rich lineage, this session seeks to explore ways for critiquing neoliberalism in its fragmented, variegated, post-crisis state. A durable framework for critiquing neoliberalism would thread together these instances of injustice and inequality using the common strands of the inherent contradictions of capitalism. For example, papers could focus on specific aspects of neoliberal theory: geographies of liberalization, individualism, freedom (Friedman 2002[1962]; Peck 2010), decentralization (Hayek 2007[1944]) or "homo economicus"(entrepreneur of the self) (Foucault 2008[1979], p.226; Read 2009). Realizing that neoliberal practice is not always smoothly rolled out, and is contingent upon the preexisting topography of located spaces and places (cf. Larner 2003),  this session can also host papers that examine neoliberal practice(s) in view of their contingent outcomes.

Please send your abstracts by November 20th to: 

Carlo E. Sica (cesica@syr.edu) 

John Lauermann (jlauermann@clarku.edu)

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

. The privatization of governance

. The decentralization of urban/environmental governance

. The historical development of neoliberalization

. Freedom, choice and development

. Accumulation by dispossession 

. Entrepreneurialism and homo economicus

. Sustainability and other neoliberal fantasies

Sources:

Brenner, N., J. Peck and N. Theodore, 2010. Variegated neoliberalization: geographies, modalities, pathways. Global Networks 10, 182-222.

Foucault, M., 2008. The Birth of Biopolitics: Lectures at the Collège de France 1978-1979 M. Senellart et al., eds., New York: Picador/Palgrave Macmillan.

Friedman, M., 2002. Capitalism and Freedom 3rd ed. R. D. Friedman, ed., Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Hayek, F.A., 2007. The Road to Serfdom 3rd ed. B. Caldwell, ed., Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Larner, W., 2003. Neoliberalism? Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, 21(5), pp.509-512.

Peck, J., N. Theodore and N. Brenner, 2009. Postneoliberalism and its Malcontents. Antipode 41, 94-116.

Peck, J., 2010. Freedom, rebooted; Finding the Chicago School. In Constructions of Neoliberal Reason. New York: Oxford University Press.

Read, J., 2009. A Genealogy of Homo-Economicus: Neoliberalism and the Production of Subjectivity. Foucault Studies, (6), pp.25-36.

Smith, N. 2009. Toxic Capitalism. New Political Economy 14, 407 - 12.


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April 9-13, Los Angeles, California



PLENARY LECTURE

 

3280 Energy and Environment Annual Plenary Lecture: "The Changing Energy Landscapes of North America." Dr. Martin Pasqualetti

is scheduled on Thursday, 4/11/2013, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Roman, Biltmore, Mezzanine Level

Sponsorship(s):
Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Matthew Huber - Syracuse University

Chair(s):
Matthew Huber - Syracuse University

Introduction:
Matthew Huber - Syracuse University

Panelist(s):
Martin Pasqualetti - Arizona State University

BUSINESS MEETING

 

3907 Energy and Environment Specialty Group Business Meeting

is scheduled on Thursday, 4/11/2013, from 8:30 PM - 9:30 PM in Palos Verdes, Westin, Lobby Level

Sponsorship(s):
Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Program Committee

 

PAPER SESSIONS

 

Paper Session:

3558 A Golden Age of Gas? Understanding the Geographical Political Economy of Natural Gas, 1

is scheduled on Thursday, 4/11/2013, from 2:40 PM - 4:20 PM in Melrose, The LA Hotel, Level 2

Sponsorship(s):
Economic Geography Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Climate Change, Variability, Adaptation and Justice

Organizer(s):
Gavin Bridge - University of Manchester
Stefan Bouzarovski - University of Manchester

Chair(s):
Michael J Bradshaw - University of Leicester

Abstract(s):
 
2:40 PM   Author(s): *Joseph L Dutton - University of Leicester



 Abstract Title: European Shale Gas: In The Pipeline Or just A Pipedream?

3:00 PM   Author(s): *Arielle Hesse - Penn State



 Abstract Title: Becoming a Marcellus Man: Fracking Masculinities in a Safety Supply Store

3:20 PM   Author(s): *Deborah A. Kittner, MPA - University of Cincinnati



 Abstract Title: An Analysis of Stakeholders in the Marcellus Shale of Pennsylvania: Across Sector and Scale

3:40 PM   Author(s): *Stefan Bouzarovski - University of Manchester



 Abstract Title: Overland Hydrocarbon Flows as a Socio-Technical Assemblage: Mapping the Governance of European Piped Gas Imports

4:00 PM   Author(s): *Gavin Bridge - University of Manchester



 Abstract Title: The Territorialities of Liquified Natural Gas



Session Description: The prospects for the future of natural gas and its role in the global energy mix are more uncertain now than they have ever been. In the United States, surging unconventional gas production has increased gas supply and eroded the North American LNG market, contributing to a global 'gas glut'. Meanwhile, the possibility for a 'nuclear renaissance' is being reassessed in the wake of Fukushima - leading potentially to a renewed dash for gas; and in North America, Europe and Asia debate continues about the role of natural gas as a 'bridging' or 'transition' fuel to a low carbon future. Assessing these changes, the International Energy Agency (2011) has raised the prospect of a 'golden age' of natural gas: the implications of any golden age for the climate or for gas-field communities are, however, deeply ambiguous.

Recent geographical research has highlighted the importance of understanding the political economy of fossil fuels as part of a broader energy research agenda. Patterns of investment in gas infrastructure  - drilling rigs, pipelines, LNG terminals - and movements of gas are changing in significant ways at the regional and world scale. These in turn are challenging the role of oil indexation and long-term contracts in the global gas industry, potentially transforming established practices for governing the gas commodity chain. There is also widespread concern about the environmental and social implications of gas exploitation. Given the rapid evolution of the natural gas sector (in North America, in particular) - and the way gas is closely linked to socially-significant objectives like economic development, climate change and energy security - this session (and the one that follows) examine emerging geographical political economies of natural gas.

 

3658 A Golden Age of Gas? Understanding the Geographical Political Economy of Natural Gas, 2

is scheduled on Thursday, 4/11/2013, from 4:40 PM - 6:20 PM in Melrose, The LA Hotel, Level 2

Sponsorship(s):
Economic Geography Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Climate Change, Variability, Adaptation and Justice

Organizer(s):
Gavin Bridge - University of Manchester
Stefan Bouzarovski - University of Manchester

Chair(s):
Joseph L Dutton - University of Leicester

Abstract(s):
 
4:40 PM   Author(s): *Adrian Duhalt - Universidad de las Americas - Puebla



 Abstract Title: Shale gas in Mexico: key implications to reflect on

5:00 PM   Author(s): *Bret Gustafson - Washington University



 Abstract Title: Emerging Geopolitics of Gas in Bolivia and Brazil

5:20 PM   Author(s): *Carlo E. Sica, masters candidate in geography - Syracuse University



 Abstract Title: Scales over Shale: Producing Pennsylvania in Another Geography of Energy

5:40 PM   Author(s): *Matthew Fry - University of North Texas



 Abstract Title: Shale Gas, Urban Drilling, and Distance Ordinances in Texas

2634 Advances in energy conservation research

is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/10/2013, from 4:40 PM - 6:20 PM in Laguna Parlor 3024, Westin, 30th Floor

Sponsorship(s):
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Environmental Perception and Behavioral Geography Specialty Group
Geographic Information Science and Systems Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Tingting Zhao - Florida State University

Chair(s):
Tingting Zhao - Florida State University

Abstract(s):
 
4:40 PM   Author(s): *Braulio A Quintero - SUNY-ESF



 Abstract Title: Puerto Rico's energy consumption patterns and the economic implications in a resource constrained future.

5:00 PM   Author(s): *Yuyu Zhou - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Leon Clarke - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Jiyong Eom - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Page Kyle - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Pralit Patel - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory







 Abstract Title: Climate Change Impact on U.S. Building Energy Use at State Level

5:20 PM   Author(s): *Paul Parker, PhD - University of Waterloo
Christina Hoicka - University of Waterloo
Shane O'Neil - University of Waterloo





 Abstract Title: Low Carbon Pathways: Insights to Improve Residential Energy Performance

5:40 PM   Author(s): *Gernot Paulus - School of Geoinformation, Carinthia University of Applied Sciences
Bernhard Kosar - School of Geoinformation, Carinthia University of Applied Sciences
Christoph Erlacher - School of Geoinformation, Carinthia University of Applied Sciences
Karl-Heinrich Anders - School of Geoinformation, Carinthia University of Applied Sciences






 Abstract Title: Energy efficient communities - Development of a Web GIS portal for managing local energy data

6:00 PM   Author(s): *Tingting Zhao - Florida State University



 Abstract Title: Energy conservation efficacy: Efficiency or curtailment?



Session Description: Despite the growing share of renewable energy, the human society still depends mainly on nonrenewable energy resources (fossil fuels and nuclear energy) to meet our daily needs. This makes energy conservation increasingly important, since improving energy efficiency and curtailing energy uses help at least delaying exhaustion of those nonrenewable resources. This paper session serves as a channel for scholars to present their innovative work on energy conservation. Topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

Energy consumption patterns
Energy and water-use efficiency
Low-carbon urban development
Energy conservation behavior
Energy conservation policies and incentives
Diffusion of energy conservation technologies and policies

If you are interested in contributing a talk to this paper session, please email Dr. Tingting Zhao (tzhao@fsu.edu) with your presentation abstract and PIN by Wednesday, Oct 24, 2012.

 

3245 Climate Change and Sustainable Development Plans: Evaluation of Co-Benefits

is scheduled on Thursday, 4/11/2013, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Malibu Parlor 3138, Westin, 31st Floor

Sponsorship(s):
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Climate Change, Variability, Adaptation and Justice

Organizer(s):
Dan Wei - University of Southern California

Chair(s):
Dan Wei - University of Southern California

Abstract(s):
 
10:00 AM   Author(s): *Hilda Blanco, Prof. - Univeristy of Southern California



 Abstract Title: Spatial Planning, Sustainable Development, and Climate Change Mitigation: Current Evidence

10:20 AM   Author(s): Hasan Ikhrata - SCAG
Frank Wen - SCAG
*Simon Choi - SCAG





 Abstract Title: Climate Change and Sustainable Development: SCAG's 2012-2035 Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy (RTP/SCS)

10:40 AM   Author(s): *Dan Wei - University of Southern California
Adam Rose - University of Southern California




 Abstract Title: Macroeconomic Impacts of AB 32 on the SCAG Economy

11:00 AM   Author(s): *Sue Lieu - SCAQMD
Joe Cassmassi - SCAQMD
Leland Deck -
Shah Dabirian - SCAQMD
Gang Shao - Macrosys, LLC
Greg Hunter - SCAQMD








 Abstract Title: An Integrated Approach to Assessing Impacts of Air Quality Management Plan



Session Description: Since 2000, comprehensive climate change mitigation action plans have been widely developed at the state, regional, and local levels to address the problem of global warming and to facilitate the goal of sustainable development.   The recommended climate change actions cover all sectors in the economy, promote a variety of advanced technologies, and utilize an array of policy instruments.  

Climate change action planning is essential to helping states and regions attain climate stabilization targets.  At the same time, it is important to evaluate the socioeconomic impacts of these actions, as well as any potential co-benefits.  Many recent studies indicate that with carefully designed and constructed policies, there might not be a trade-off between emission reduction and economic growth.   In addition, climate change actions, in many facets, are in accordance with other regional and local sustainable development plans.  Many sectoral-based climate change actions, such as promoting smart growth and transit-oriented development, can bring benefits such as transportation fuel savings and regional productivity enhancement.  Moreover, many actions that mitigate GHG emissions from both stationary and mobile sources can also help reduce ordinary pollution emissions thereby improving air quality and public health.  

This session will include papers that focus on state and regional climate change actions and related sustainable development plans, as well as the analysis of their social, economic, and environmental impacts.  We encourage papers on (but not limited to) the following topics:

- State and regional action planning on climate change and sustainable development
- Low and zero emission technologies
- Socioeconomic impacts of climate change policies
- Socioeconomic impacts of air quality management plans
- Impacts of regional transportation plans
- Co-benefits of climate change actions

 

4173 Climate Policy as Industrial Policy: Emerging Geographies in the Making of the Green Economy 1

is scheduled on Friday, 4/12/2013, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in Corinthian, Biltmore, Mezzanine Level

Sponsorship(s):
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group
European Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Jia Ching Chen - University of California, Berkeley
Abigail Martin

Chair(s):
Abigail Martin

Abstract(s):
 
8:00 AM   Author(s): *Dustin Mulvaney - University Of California - Berkeley



 Abstract Title: Solyndra, Sand Hill Road, and Shadow Banks: Grabbing Clean Energy Futures in the Great Solar Bubble

8:20 AM   Author(s): *Jia Ching Chen - University of California, Berkeley



 Abstract Title: Zoning for Green: Emerging Geographies of Climate Governance, Industrial Development and Agrarian Transition

8:40 AM   Author(s): *Jeffrey Jenkins - University of California, Santa Cruz



 Abstract Title: Producing environmental policy for rare earth element mining in the United States:

9:00 AM   Author(s): *Marvin Joseph Montefrio - SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry



 Abstract Title: Integration of Smallholders in Agro-industrial Production of Low-Carbon Commodities: Political Discourse on Indigenous Populations and Environments in the Philippines

9:20 AM   Discussant: Sarah Knuth - UC - Berkeley



 

Discussant(s):
Sarah Knuth - UC - Berkeley



Session Description: Despite the many shortcomings of the UNFCCC Conferences of the Parties, nation states and sub-national state authorities have responded to the challenges of climate change with a broad array of policies. The resulting terrain of governmental and corporate programs linking energy, greenhouse gas reductions and economic development is expansive, underpinning a broad notion of the "the green economy." As new industries emerge promising climate change mitigation through low carbon products and services, the boundaries between climate policy and industrial policy increasingly overlap. Although "industrial policy" is rarely mentioned in critical scholarship on the politics of climate change, at various levels of governance, it has become a more visible component of climate change mitigation strategies. Domestic advocacy groups, governmental officials and private sector actors concerned with "sustainable economic development" have linked climate policy to debates about the economy, rendering efforts to stabilize greenhouse gas levels into political justifications for industrial development. At the transnational level, questions of "differential responsibility" for climate change mitigation arise directly from notions of the "the right to develop" and energy security.

This paper session examines the overlaps between climate policy and industrial policy from a wide array of theoretical and methodological perspectives. Engaging recent scholarship, the authors raise important questions about knowledge production in climate policy, the political economy of climate change mitigation, and the cultural politics of climate change as an ecological crisis. This session endeavors to build upon these critical approaches to the study of climate policy by examining cases in which industrial policies are shaped by (and constitutive of) intersections between the geographies of energy, climate change mitigation and economic development.

 

4273 Climate Policy as Industrial Policy: Emerging Geographies in the Making of the Green Economy 2

is scheduled on Friday, 4/12/2013, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Corinthian, Biltmore, Mezzanine Level

Sponsorship(s):
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group
European Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Abigail Martin
Jia Ching Chen - University of California, Berkeley

Chair(s):
Jia Ching Chen - University of California, Berkeley

Abstract(s):
 
10:00 AM   Author(s): Lars Coenen - CIRCLE, Lund University
*Teis Hansen - CIRCLE, Lund University
Ulrich Elmer Hansen - UNEP Risø Centre, Risø DTU, Technical University of Denmark





 Abstract Title: Putting all eggs in one basket? The promotion of renewable energy industries in Denmark

10:20 AM   Author(s): *Katherine Ruth M Machen - Durham University



 Abstract Title: Evidence Without Belief? Exploring the Politics of Knowledge at the Climate Science-Policy Interface in Scotland.

10:40 AM   Author(s): *Peter Kedron - Ryerson University
Sharmistha Bagchi-Sen - SUNY-Buffalo




 Abstract Title: Policy relevance in industry life cycles and regional evolution

11:00 AM   Author(s): *Abigail Martin, PhD Candidate - UC-Berkeley



 Abstract Title: Emergent Climate Governance in Biofuel Development Strategies in Brazil and the US

11:20 AM   Discussant: Alastair Iles - UC Berkeley



 

Discussant(s):
Alastair Iles - UC Berkeley

 

1111 Contesting and Constructing Spaces of Mobility and Transport I

is scheduled on Tuesday, 4/9/2013, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in San Gabriel B, Westin, Lobby Level

Sponsorship(s):
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Transportation Geography Specialty Group
Urban Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Julie Cidell - University of Illinois
Donald Anderson

Chair(s):
Jean-Paul Addie - York University

Abstract(s):
 
8:00 AM   Author(s): *Jean-Paul Addie - York University



 Abstract Title: Mobility and marginality in the urban in-between

8:20 AM   Author(s): *Christian Mettke - Darmstadt University of Technology



 Abstract Title: The (Post-)Suburbanization of Public Transit in the Greater Toronto Area

8:40 AM   Author(s): *Camille Gardesse - Latts Université Paris Est
*Nicola Headlam - University of Liverpool




 Abstract Title: Governance of highly contested spaces : A UK-French comparison. The "Triangle of Gonesse" (Paris, France) and the "Airportcity Enterprize Zone" (Manchester, UK)

9:00 AM   Author(s): *Sophie L.Van Neste - Université INRS-UCS



 Abstract Title: Re-framing urban mobility : the spatialities involved in Montreal and Rotterdam-The Hague

9:20 AM   Discussant: Jason M Henderson - San Francisco State University



 

Discussant(s):
Jason M Henderson - San Francisco State University



Session Description: Transportation geography is positioned to make important contributions to emerging debates in spatial theory and planning practice, including a significant 'mobilities' turn in the social sciences and the challenge of sustainable transport in transport/urban planning. Processes of political-economic change like neoliberalism -- at a variety of scales -- are largely structured through transportation; the new field of mobilities has underlined the importance of the social meanings of transportation and mobility across all modes (Sheller and Urry 2006); and planners confront the challenge of greening transport and improving quality of life. But there remains to be seen how a critical engagement with institutions, practices, and discourses of transportation modes and infrastructures might contribute to understanding and engaging contemporary social, political, and economic challenges.

Papers in this session critically engage the spatialities of transportation, including mobile bodies and materials (human/non-human, vehicular and non-vehicular), transport nodes and places, territories and scales, networks/infrastructure, and the spatial practices and relations that connect them. By "critical," we mean an approach that highlights the power geometries (Massey, 1994) of transport systems, critiquing mobile actors and infrastructures, analyzing discourses of transportation and policy, or exploring the contested nature of spaces and places of transportation and mobility. We also include papers that explore the ways people, including planners, contest and construct transportation spaces in pursuit of more just and sustainable alternatives, contributing to geographical and planning debates by considering the political economy of transportation and infrastructure as it is and has been, and the possibilities for positive change.

 

1211 Contesting and Constructing Spaces of Mobility and Transport II

is scheduled on Tuesday, 4/9/2013, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in San Gabriel B, Westin, Lobby Level

Sponsorship(s):
Transportation Geography Specialty Group
Urban Geography Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Julie Cidell - University of Illinois
Donald Anderson

Chair(s):
Donald Anderson

Abstract(s):
 
10:00 AM   Author(s): *Donald N. Anderson - University of Arizona



 Abstract Title: Cabbies, Chauffeurs, or "Friends with Cars?" Shared Rides and Affective Labor on the Streets of San Francisco

10:20 AM   Author(s): *Shannon Jackson, Associate Professor - University of Missouri



 Abstract Title: Memory and Movement in Kansas City

10:40 AM   Author(s): *Catherine Jean Nash, Dr. - Brock university, Department of Geography
Andrew Gorman-Murray - University of Western Sydney




 Abstract Title: LGBT neighborhoods and 'new mobilities': towards understanding transformations in sexual and gendered urban landscapes

11:00 AM   Author(s): *Bascom Guffin - Dept. of Anthropology, University of California, Davis



 Abstract Title: Spatial and Social Mobilities of Cyberabad's New Middle Class

11:20 AM   Author(s): *Denver V Nixon - University of the Fraser Valley



 Abstract Title: Contours of Displacement: Path Dependence and Cyclist Dislocation from the Flattest Path

 

1411 Contesting and Constructing Spaces of Mobility and Transport III

is scheduled on Tuesday, 4/9/2013, from 12:40 PM - 2:20 PM in San Gabriel B, Westin, Lobby Level

Sponsorship(s):
Transportation Geography Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Urban Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Julie Cidell - University of Illinois
Donald Anderson

Chair(s):
Michael Minn - University of Illinois

Abstract(s):
 
12:40 PM   Author(s): *Theodore H Grossardt, Ph D - University of Kentucky



 Abstract Title: Rail Mobility: Moving Labor In, and Grain Out, on the pre-WWI High Plains

1:00 PM   Author(s): *Michael Minn - University of Illinois



 Abstract Title: American Passenger Rail Network Durability and the Spaces of Actor-Network Theory

1:20 PM   Author(s): *Martin Danyluk - University of Toronto



 Abstract Title: Logistics, Dialectics, and Right-Wing Revolution

1:40 PM   Author(s): *Mimi Sheller - Drexel University



 Abstract Title: Infrastructural Futures: Contested Mobilities and the Materiality of Aluminum

1511 Contesting and Constructing Spaces of Mobility and Transport IV

is scheduled on Tuesday, 4/9/2013, from 2:40 PM - 4:20 PM in San Gabriel B, Westin, Lobby Level

Sponsorship(s):
Transportation Geography Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Urban Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Julie Cidell - University of Illinois
Donald Anderson

Chair(s):
Jenni Kuoppa - Aalto University

Abstract(s):
 
2:40 PM   Author(s): *Gregg Culver - University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Department of Geography



 Abstract Title: Level of Service and the politics of reconstructing Milwaukee's Hoan Bridge

3:00 PM   Author(s): *Phillip Gordon Mackintosh - Brock University



 Abstract Title: The Sidewalk and the Road: Children, Automobiles, and the Globe's Just Kids Safety Club, 1920-1930

3:20 PM   Author(s): *Damon Scott, Ph.d. - Miami University



 Abstract Title: The Motorman Mayor and the Parade of Transit Progress in the Development of the San Francisco Municipal Railway

3:40 PM   Author(s): *Jenni Kuoppa - Aalto University



 Abstract Title: The Promises of Walking in Everyday Life

 

1611 Contesting and Constructing Spaces of Mobility and Transport V

is scheduled on Tuesday, 4/9/2013, from 4:40 PM - 6:20 PM in San Gabriel B, Westin, Lobby Level

Sponsorship(s):
Transportation Geography Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Urban Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Julie Cidell - University of Illinois

Chair(s):
Matthew Pruter

Abstract(s):
 
4:40 PM   Author(s): *Ramachandraiah Chigurupati - Centre for Economic & Social Studies



 Abstract Title: Elevated Metro Rail and Undoing the City - Social Activism against a PPP Project in Hyderabad, India

5:00 PM   Author(s): *Matthew Pruter -



 Abstract Title: Bicycling in Los Angeles: The Clash of Modal Civilizations

5:20 PM   Author(s): *Miriam Grace Eason - University California, Berkeley



 Abstract Title: Sunday Streets: Recreational Equity and Volunteer Conflicts

5:40 PM   Author(s): *George Villanueva - University of Southern California
George Allen O. Villanueva, PhD Candidate - USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism
Benjamin Stokes, PhD Candidate - USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism
Francois Bar, PhD - USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism
Otto Khera, MA - University of Southern California







 Abstract Title: ParTour: Leveraging the Dual Mobilities of Cellphones and Bicycles to Re-Imagine Urban Space in South Los Angeles

6:00 PM   Author(s): *Paulla A Ebron - Stanford Univ.
*Claudia Engel - Stanford University




 Abstract Title: Roots and Routes

 

1137 Crises in the countryside? Part 1: Global crises, local responses

is scheduled on Tuesday, 4/9/2013, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in Laguna Parlor 3048, Westin, 30th Floor

Sponsorship(s):
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Geographies of Food and Agriculture Specialty Group
Rural Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Jennifer Dickie - University of Leicester, UK
Martin Phillips - UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER

Chair(s):
Jennifer Dickie - University of Leicester, UK

Abstract(s):
 
8:00 AM   Introduction: Jennifer Dickie - University of Leicester, UK




 
8:02 AM   Author(s): *Michael Woods - Aberystwyth University



 Abstract Title: Grounding Global Challenges and the Relational Politics of the Rural

8:22 AM   Author(s): *Martin Phillips - UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER



 Abstract Title: Crisis and Statis: Paradoxical Imaginings of Rural Futures

8:42 AM   Author(s): *Mark Scott - UNIVERSITY COLLEGE DUBLIN



 Abstract Title: Resilience and reframing rural development in a time of crisis: insights from Ireland

9:02 AM   Author(s): *Maura Farrell, Dr. - Discipline of Geography, National University Ireland Galway
Marie Mahon, Dr. - National university Ireland Galway
John McDonagh , Dr. - National university Ireland Galway





 Abstract Title: Return Migration: An Integral Component of Rural Development

9:22 AM   Discussant: Lars Coenen - Lund University, Sweden




 

Discussant(s):
Lars Coenen - Lund University, Sweden



Session Description: North (2010) has suggested that over the next 20-50 years humanity will face a series of inter-locking crises, including but not restricted to the 'triple crises' of global climate change, food security and peak oil identified by Shiva (2008). North adds that it is evident that responses to one crisis might well exacerbate others and that quite contradictory, and in themselves potentially risk laden, responses are emerging. Biofuel development, for instance, whilst being posited as mitigation for both energy and climate challenges may heighten food security problems, while biotechnological development of food and energy crops raise new environmental and health risks, as well as heightening processes of economic concentration, corporatisation and marginalisation. Notions of crisis may themselves be constitutive of apocalyptic imaginaries that displace recognition of currently existing conflicts and relations of power (Swyngedouw 2010), as well as create new power-regimes generative of their own dynamics of changes.

The focus of these three sessions is to consider the significance of crisis tendencies, discourses and power-regimes on rural areas and their people. As well as global crises such as the triplet identified above, and others such as the financial crisis, there are what might be viewed as more localised crises linked to localised transformations of rural space. Such transformations and associated crises may be of a highly personalised and emotional/affectual nature: Carolan (2008) for example has argued that the loss of material features in rural space mal be experienced in "more real - more sensual, more physical" ways than is often recognised. These losses might indeed be viewed by some as constituting a crisis in their connection with the rural. On the other hand, changes in the rural may afford new opportunities and allow new visions of the countryside and its people to emerge and be practiced.

The focus of this first session on 'Crises in the Countryside' explores how rural localities and people are impacted by and respond to the global crises of food, finance, energy, migration and climate change.

 

1237 Crises in the countryside? Part 2: Responding to crises, preparing for the future

is scheduled on Tuesday, 4/9/2013, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Laguna Parlor 3048, Westin, 30th Floor

Sponsorship(s):
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Rural Geography Specialty Group
Geographies of Food and Agriculture Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Jennifer Dickie - University of Leicester, UK
Martin Phillips - UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER

Chair(s):
Mark Scott - UNIVERSITY COLLEGE DUBLIN

Abstract(s):
 
10:00 AM   Introduction: Mark Scott - UNIVERSITY COLLEGE DUBLIN



 
10:02 AM   Author(s): *Jennifer Dickie - University of Leicester, UK
Martin Phillips - University of Leicester




 Abstract Title: The Emerging Energy Landscape of the British Countryside: An Investigation of the Hybridity of Renewable Energy Systems

10:22 AM   Author(s): *Justine Law - The Ohio State University



 Abstract Title: Burning wood to power alternative rural economies? A case study of woody biomass energy generation in Vermont

10:42 AM   Author(s): *J. Mark Baker - Humboldt State University



 Abstract Title: Neoliberalism and the Environment: Analyzing the Local Impacts of Small Hydropower Development in the Western Himalaya, India

11:02 AM   Author(s): *Fabian Faller - University of Luxembourg



 Abstract Title: Everyday economic practices as processes of regionalisations

11:22 AM   Discussant: Gordon Walker - LANCASTER UNIVERSITY


 

Discussant(s):
Gordon Walker - LANCASTER UNIVERSITY

 

1437 Crises in the countryside? Part 3: Local crises, alternative futures

is scheduled on Tuesday, 4/9/2013, from 12:40 PM - 2:20 PM in Laguna Parlor 3048, Westin, 30th Floor

Sponsorship(s):
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Geographies of Food and Agriculture Specialty Group
Rural Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Jennifer Dickie - University of Leicester, UK
Martin Phillips - UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER

Chair(s):
Martin Phillips - UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER

Abstract(s):
 
12:40 PM   Introduction: Martin Phillips - UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER



 
12:42 PM   Author(s): *Jessica Wilczak - University of Toronto



 Abstract Title: Crisis and Opportunity in Rural China: Building a New Socialist Countryside in the Aftermath of the Wenchuan Earthquake

1:02 PM   Author(s): *Marisa Wilson, MPhil, DPhil (Oxon) - University of the West Indies



 Abstract Title: Alternative Rural Futures and Scale in Cuba: Crisis and Continuity

1:22 PM   Author(s): *Neusa Hidalgo Monroy, PHD - University of Toledo
Neusa Hidalgo Monroy, Ph D - University of Toledo




 Abstract Title: ALTERNATIVES TO RURAL DEVELOPMENT: ORGANIC AGRICULTURE AND INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES IN MEXICO

1:42 PM   Author(s): *Claire Jarvis - University of Leicester UK
Martin Phillips - UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER
Jennifer Dickie - University of Leicester





 Abstract Title: 3D visualisation of industrial and grassroots adaptation to uncertain climatic and socio-economic futures

2:02 PM   Discussant: Michael Woods - Aberystwyth University

 

2547 Dynamic Extend Change Analysis of Land Use Based on GIS------A case study of Guiyang in China

is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/10/2013, from 2:40 PM - 4:20 PM in Malibu Parlor 3178, Westin, 31st Floor

Sponsorship(s):
China Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Communication Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Li Lu - The University of Kitakyushu

Chair(s):
Li Lu - The University of Kitakyushu

Abstract(s):
 
2:40 PM   Author(s): *Li Lu - The University of Kitakyushu
Li Lu - Faculty of Environmental Engineering, The University of Kitakyushu, Japan
Gao Wei Jun - Faculty of Environmental Engineering, The University of Kitakyushu, Japan





 Abstract Title: Dynamic Extend Change Analysis of Land Use Based on GIS------A case study of Guiyang in China



Session Description: This article based on four phases of land use patterns obtained in 1990, 2000, 2005 and 2010 with integrating spatial system, studied the dynamic change and transformation of various land use types with Guiyang in China as a case study. This article aimed to analyze the characteristics of quantitative and spatial change of land use in the past 20 years in the developing country.

 

5536 Electric and Alternative Fueled Transport

is scheduled on Saturday, 4/13/2013, from 4:00 PM - 5:40 PM in Laguna Parlor 3044, Westin, 30th Floor

Sponsorship(s):
Transportation Geography Specialty Group
Urban Geography Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Bradley Lane - The University of Texas at El Paso

Chair(s):
Bradley Lane - The University of Texas at El Paso

Abstract(s):
 
4:00 PM   Author(s): *Scott Kelley - Arizona State University
Michael Kuby - Arizona State University




 Abstract Title: Observed Driving and Refueling Behavior of Compressed Natural Gas Fleets in Southern California

4:20 PM   Author(s): *Bradley W. Lane - The University of Texas at El Paso
Rachel M. Krause - The University of Texas at El Paso
Sanya Carley - Indiana University





 Abstract Title: The Influence of Travel Behavior on Electric Vehicle Appeal



Session Description: This session seeks to build off successful sessions at past AAG meetings on electric and alternative fuels in transport. For decades, research and technological investment has pursued development of numerous forms of alternative fuels for transport vehicles, including natural gas, bio-fuels, hydrogen, electric, and hybrid propulsion systems. More recently, the US, China and most of the developed world have instituted policies incentivizing electric vehicle production to meet targets for fleet penetration. The Nissan Leaf and Chevy Volt have been introduced as the first mass-produced electric vehicles in the era of the gasoline engine, but sluggish sales of these and other models have both public and private sector decision makers questioning the utility of these investments.

Though the unsustainability of a petroleum-dependent transport sector has been well documented, major questions remain about the viability of alternative fuels. These include technological development and investment in alternative fuels, infrastructure for refueling and recharging, the economic impact of investment and development in alternative fuel development, cost of alternative fuel development and transition, government intervention in the marketplace, and the commercial viability of alternative fuel and electric vehicles.

This is a call for research on and related to alternative fuels in transport. An interesting session would have a broad and diverse array of papers related to the subject, and some example paper topics include (but are by no means limited to):
•      Consumer adoption
•      Policies and planning
•      Travel behavior
•      Technological development
•      Economic development
•      Infrastructure issues
•      Environmental and resource impacts
•      The role of pricing and energy costs


3150 Eurasia's Environmental, Economic, and Geopolitical Transformations PART I

is scheduled on Thursday, 4/11/2013, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in Angeleno, The LA Hotel, Level 2

Sponsorship(s):
Russian, Central Eurasian, and East European Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Human Dimensions of Global Change Specialty Group
Global Urbanization

Organizer(s):
Jeremy Tasch - Towson University
Nathaniel Trumbull - University of Connecticut

Chair(s):
Nathaniel Trumbull - University of Connecticut

Abstract(s):
 
8:00 AM   Author(s): *Craig ZumBrunnen, Professor of Geography - University of Washington



 Abstract Title: Russia: A Nation in the Throws of Climate Change

8:20 AM   Author(s): *Nathaniel Trumbull - University of Connecticut



 Abstract Title: State-Initiated Greenwashing in the Former Soviet Union

8:40 AM   Author(s): *Kristopher D. White - KIMEP University



 Abstract Title: Nature, Economy, and the Aral Sea



Session Description: Changes to the physical landscapes of post-Socialist Eurasia reflect intersections of Imperial Russian, Soviet planned, and contemporary interpretations of progress and modernization. Large-scale projects, including new sites for natural resource extraction and transportation infrastructure, illustrate how the physical environment continues to be transformed through the nexus of political, economic, and technological access and control.

Broad developments, such as the rise of continental trade that criss-crosses the entire Eurasian landmass, the strengthening of regional interconnections from Western Europe to Pacific China through direct highways, railroads, and complex energy transport networks, and the intensifying pressures to expand natural resource extraction and transportation across the Arctic and throughout the Russian Far East, present a mosaic of contrasting perspectives and expectations among diverse stakeholders and interested observers.

Amidst the variety of development challenges and opportunities spanning Eurasia, citizens may find themselves located on the weaker side of asymmetrical local and national power hierarchies, governments may form alliances with corporate entities for the creation of "mega-projects," and international NGOs and local organizations may be required by government officials to identify themselves as "foreign agents." ??This session invites contributions from graduate students and scholars who are investigating the variety of trade, transport, and resource extraction projects that are cumulatively bringing about fundamental environmental, economic, and political changes to the world's largest continent.
This is Part I of Three Connected Sessions (I, II, III), each co-sponsored by the following Specialty Groups:
Russian, Central Eurasian, & East European Specialty Groups;
Asian Geography Specialty Group
Economic Geography Specialty Group
Energy & Environment Specialty Group
Human Dimensions of Global Change

 

3450 Eurasia's Environmental, Economic, and Geopolitical Transformations PART III

is scheduled on Thursday, 4/11/2013, from 12:40 PM - 2:20 PM in Angeleno, The LA Hotel, Level 2

Sponsorship(s):
Russian, Central Eurasian, and East European Specialty Group
Economic Geography Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Global Urbanization

Organizer(s):
Jeremy Tasch - Towson University
Nathaniel Trumbull - University of Connecticut

Chair(s):
Jeremy Tasch - Towson University

Abstract(s):
 
12:40 PM   Author(s): *Tuomas Suutarinen - University of Helsinki



 Abstract Title: Acceptance of foreign investments in a Russian mining community

1:00 PM   Author(s): *Jeremy Tasch, Ph.D. - Towson University



 Abstract Title: Tiffany's, Gucci, & Dior: Azerbaijan's Oil Wealth and the Hope for Trickle Down Along the Absheron Peninsula

1:20 PM   Discussant: Tom Narins - Student



 

Discussant(s):
Tom Narins – Student

 

2559 Extractive Industries: Development and Governance, Part I: Impact, community, and the governance of development opportunity

is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/10/2013, from 2:40 PM - 4:20 PM in Olvera, The LA Hotel, Level 2

Sponsorship(s):
Development Geographies Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Caitlin A McElroy - Oxford University

Chair(s):
Caitlin A McElroy - Oxford University

Abstract(s):
 
2:40 PM   Author(s): *Lauren Baker - Yale University



 Abstract Title: Indigenous politics regarding oil concessions in the Peruvian Amazon: Confronting Invisibility, Impunity, and Abandonment

3:00 PM   Author(s): *Juan Luis Dammert, PhD Student, Graduate School of Geography - Clark University



 Abstract Title: Offshore-inland gas extraction in the Amazon: environmental governance of the Camisea project in the lower Urubamba, Peru

3:20 PM   Author(s): *Fenda A Akiwumi, Ph.D. - University of South Florida



 Abstract Title: Strangers, Indigenes and Sierra Leone Mining: Antagonism, Alliance and Policy Challenges

3:40 PM   Author(s): *Meredith DeBoom - University of Colorado at Boulder



 Abstract Title: Politics and Geopolitics of Foreign Investment in Namibia's Extractive Industries: A Mixed Methods Approach

4:00 PM   Discussant: Jessica Budds - University of Reading



 

Discussant(s):
Jessica Budds - University of Reading



Session Description: This paper session aims to foster a broad dialogue about the diversity of research concerning the extractive industries (oil, gas, and mining) and development. This first session seeks to address the different approaches to the governance of extractives projects and their consequences for particular communities and national development plans. This includes discussion of community relations and the management of conflict generated from the presence of resource extraction. Critically, resource use and the advancement of the industry are examined against development opportunities - the challenging intersection of economic structures and social values. These questions are tackled in the presentations from regional and national perspectives through examples of the relationship between the impacts of the extractive sector and actions for the governance of resource use and benefits.

 

2659 Extractive Industries: Development and Governance, Part II: Science, Politics, and Resource Governance Policy

is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/10/2013, from 4:40 PM - 6:20 PM in Olvera, The LA Hotel, Level 2

Sponsorship(s):
Development Geographies Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Caitlin A McElroy - Oxford University

Chair(s):
Caitlin A McElroy - Oxford University

Abstract(s):
 
4:40 PM   Author(s): *Sarah McGill - Oxford University



 Abstract Title: Peak Phosphorus Debates and the Geopolitics of Natural Resource Scarcity

5:00 PM   Author(s): *Irem Kok - University of Oxford, Department of Geography and the Environment



 Abstract Title: Opening the Pandora's Box: Corporate Transparency and Science in the Marcellus Shale Development

5:20 PM   Author(s): *Yasminah Beebeejaun, PhD - Lecturer in Spatial Planning



 Abstract Title: Exploring knowledge production in the 'Dash for Gas': reconciling expert and lay perspectives

5:40 PM   Author(s): *John G Hintz - Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania



 Abstract Title: Being Pragmatic about American Gas: Energy Security, Unconventional Fuels, and Environmental Politics

6:00 PM   Author(s): *Derrick Hindery, Ph.D. - University of Oregon (International Studies and Geography)



 Abstract Title: Bait and Switch: Geographic Games with Liquefied Natural Gas

 

2602 Geographies of Hope Symposium 4: Hopeful Political Economies II

is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/10/2013, from 4:40 PM - 6:20 PM in Beaudry B, Westin, Lobby Level

Sponsorship(s):
Indigenous Peoples Specialty Group
Latin America Specialty Group
Development Geographies Specialty Group
Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Activist Geographies: Struggles for Social and Environmental Justice

Organizer(s):
Lindsay Shade - University of Kentucky

Chair(s):
Lindsay Shade - University of Kentucky

Abstract(s):
 
4:40 PM   Author(s): *Lindsay Shade, PhD Student - University of Kentucky, Department of Geography



 Abstract Title: Doing Resistance: The Inter-Play of Hope and Contradiction in the Construction of Alternatives to Mining in Ecuador's Intag Region

5:00 PM   Author(s): *Anja Kanngieser - Royal Holloway University of London



 Abstract Title: Creating radical political economies through communicating differently

5:20 PM   Author(s): *Nicholas L. Padilla - University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee



 Abstract Title: Cultivating indigenous economies in southwest Colombia: indigenous development and madre tierra

5:40 PM   Author(s): *Nicholas Brown - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign



 Abstract Title: Resisting Settler Accumulation in the Alberta/Montana Borderlands

6:00 PM   Discussant: Dianne Rocheleau - Clark University



 

Discussant(s):
Dianne Rocheleau - Clark University



Session Description: The phrase political economy suggests that politics and economy are not two separate spheres but are always intertwined. New geographies of hope contribute critical insights into the ways that political economic processes are spatialized and enacted at different scales, and in different milieus. This paper session aims to place greater emphasis on the contested politics of economic process and practice, drawing attention to the ways in which political economy not only shapes our lives, but also the ways in which people remake and create new political economies through their every day practices and forming novel networks for change. With this session, we seek to honor the memory of Neil Smith (1954-2012), whose commitment to scholar-activism and studies of social justice and uneven development have been so fundamental and inspirational to radical geography.

Often, people's aspirations for justice and 'living well' drive hopeful new forms of engagement with seemingly hegemonic political economic structures, which they challenge, resist, and transform through their engagements. From the worldwide Occupy movement, to indigenous people's and peasants' defense of culturally-based, subsistence livelihoods in the face of dispossession, to changing processes of urbanization where claims for a Right to the City have exercised new forms of collective power, to 'intentional' concepts such as transition towns, people around the world are positing and practicing radical new political economies.

The papers in this session invoke the inter-play of hope and practices of social change in the contexts of resisting, transforming, and/or constructing new political economic structures, and reflect a wide range of themes, including but not limited to, relations between people and landscapes, difference, and desire in the constitution of hopeful political economic imaginaries.

 

2105 Legacies of Extraction I

is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/10/2013, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in Los Cerritos, Westin, Lobby Level

Sponsorship(s):
Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Matthew Himley - Illinois State University
Tomas Frederiksen - University of Manchester

Chair(s):
Matthew Himley - Illinois State University

Abstract(s):
 
8:00 AM   Author(s): *Elvin Delgado, Ph.D. - Central Washington University



 Abstract Title: Re-defining the Nation's Sub-soil: The History of Oil Politics in Venezuela

8:20 AM   Author(s): *Ian MacLachlan - University Of Lethbridge



 Abstract Title: Oil Industry Dynamics in the Post World War II Era: Obsolete Bargains and the Shift to Market-oriented Refineries

8:40 AM   Author(s): *Tomas Frederiksen - University of Manchester



 Abstract Title: History repeated? Struggles over mining regulation in Zambia since 1890

9:00 AM   Author(s): *Astra Bonini - Columbia University



 Abstract Title: The Rise of China: Implications for Raw Material Producing Countries in Comparative Historical Perspective

9:20 AM   Discussant: Gavin Bridge - University of Manchester



 

Discussant(s):
Gavin Bridge - University of Manchester



Session Description: The aim of this paper session is to think through the political-ecological dynamics of the extractive industries historically. Papers will explore what patterns and trajectories are revealed by extending the temporal scale of analysis for studies of extractive economies - that is, by viewing these economies over the long haul rather than focusing on short-term periods or particular events. Lessons for contemporary natural-resource policy and management that can be drawn from such historical analyses will also be examined.

 

2205 Legacies of Extraction II

is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/10/2013, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Los Cerritos, Westin, Lobby Level

Sponsorship(s):
Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Matthew Himley - Illinois State University
Tomas Frederiksen - University of Manchester

Chair(s):
Tomas Frederiksen - University of Manchester

Abstract(s):
 
10:00 AM   Author(s): *Matthew Himley - Illinois State University



 Abstract Title: The many uses of the past: Mobilizing history in struggles over mining in Peru

10:20 AM   Author(s): *Jonathan Peyton - University of Manitoba



 Abstract Title: Transmission: Contesting Energy, Enterprise and Extraction in the New Northwest Gold Rush

10:40 AM   Author(s): *Alexandra Winton - Memorial University of Newfoundland
Joella Hogan, Heritage Manager - First Nation of Na-cho Nyak Dun




 Abstract Title: "It's just natural": First Nation Family History and the Keno Hill Silver Mine in Canada's Yukon Territory

11:00 AM   Author(s): *Kathleen Guillozet, PhD - Oregon State University
John C Bliss, PhD - Oregon State University




 Abstract Title: Forest Management in Highland Ethiopia: Linking historic information to the project management cycle

11:20 AM   Discussant: Arn Keeling - Memorial University of Newfoundland



 

Discussant(s):
Arn Keeling - Memorial University of Newfoundland

 

5458 Metabolizing Nature: The Space-time Dimensions of Commodity Production I

is scheduled on Saturday, 4/13/2013, from 2:00 PM - 3:40 PM in Melrose, The LA Hotel, Level 2

Sponsorship(s):
Economic Geography Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Elvin Delgado - Central Washington University

Chair(s):
Elvin Delgado - Central Washington University

Abstract(s):
 
2:00 PM   Author(s): *Nik Janos, Ph.D. - California State University Chico



 Abstract Title: Salmon in Seattle: The Contentious Politics of Flows of Nature and Commodities

2:20 PM   Author(s): *Joshua Cousins - University of Michigan
Joshua P. Newell - University of Michigan




 Abstract Title: Transdisciplinary Pathways for Urban Metabolism Research

2:40 PM   Author(s): *Keith Lee - University of California, Berkeley



 Abstract Title: Urban Food Metabolisms: Linking Urbanization, Food Consumption, and Food Waste Generation in East Asia

3:00 PM   Author(s): *Enrique Lanz Oca - CUNY



 Abstract Title: Energy Landscapes: The Dematerialization of Nature

3:20 PM   Author(s): *Jalel Sager - Energy and Resources Group, University of California-Berkeley



 Abstract Title: Structure and Flow: Global Institutions and Energy Price Regimes



Session Description: The 'metabolism of commodity production' - what has been referred to as the inflows and outflows of different raw materials, conversions of energy and the production of heat, pollution and waste (Bridge 2000) – has been a central concern for critical resource geographers in recent decades. Focusing on this particular moment of production is important because the material transformations that constitute this process generate social and environmental consequences that transcend the boundaries of the production site itself. Central to this process is the way in which different institutions and the state bear upon the metabolism of economy and nature by mediating the relationship between the space-time dimensions of capitalism and the space-time dimensions of ecology along the commodity production process. This paper session seeks to critically explore the metabolism of commodity production as a framework to conceptualize the different tensions and/or contradictions created through the transformation of raw materials into commodities by focusing on the social, environmental, economic and political processes embedded in these transformations. How does this concept help us in the context of our own empirical and theoretical work? What are the strengths and weaknesses of this perspective? Can we think of a different way to conceptualize this process? Where do we go from here? How does the materiality of natural resources shape this process? This session presents empirical research that advances our understanding of the metabolism of commodity production using a variety of methods and theoretical frameworks.

 

5558 Metabolizing Nature: The Space-time Dimensions of Commodity Production II

is scheduled on Saturday, 4/13/2013, from 4:00 PM - 5:40 PM in Melrose, The LA Hotel, Level 2

Sponsorship(s):
Economic Geography Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Elvin Delgado - Central Washington University

Chair(s):
Elvin Delgado - Central Washington University

Abstract(s):
 
4:00 PM   Author(s): *Osvaldo Muniz - Texas State University, San Marcos



 Abstract Title: Alternative disruptions of space-time dimensions. Alumysa Project in the Chilean Patagonia

4:20 PM   Author(s): *Aysen Eren - Bogazici University, The Institute of Environmental Sciences
Susannah McCandless, Ph.D., Adjunct Lecturer - Department of Geography, University of Vermont




 Abstract Title: Using The "Metabolism" Approach To Explain Social Conflicts over Run-of-River Hydropower Projects in Turkey

4:40 PM   Author(s): *Eve Vogel - University of Massachusetts - Amherst
Paul Hirt, PhD - Associate Professor, History, Arizona State University




 Abstract Title: The metabolism of socio-technical transformation: Highlighting environmental and social-political transformation in Pacific Northwest electrical transitions, 1870-present

5:00 PM   Author(s): *Morgan Buck - CUNY Graduate Center



 Abstract Title: Nature into Capital: Technology, value and the future of food

5:20 PM   Author(s): *Lisa J. Powell - University of Texas at Austin



 Abstract Title: Moving Energy: Intertwined Networks of Coal and Grain Transportation in Western Kentucky

 

4434 Perspectives on (Sub)Urban Sprawl, Smart Growth, Inner City Developments: Issues, Analysis and Critiques (1)

is scheduled on Friday, 4/12/2013, from 12:40 PM - 2:20 PM in Laguna Parlor 3024, Westin, 30th Floor

Sponsorship(s):
Urban Geography Specialty Group
Regional Development and Planning Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Global Urbanization

Organizer(s):
Sun Hui Sim - University of North Alabama
Francis Koti - University of North Alabama

Chair(s):
John Miron - University of Toronto

Abstract(s):
 
12:40 PM   Author(s): *Elisabetta Troglio - Royal Institute of Technology
Tigran Haas, Associate Professor - Royal Insitute of Technology




 Abstract Title: What can we learn from Eco-city projects? A case studies comparison of European cities.

1:00 PM   Author(s): *Rebecca LH Chiu - The University of Hong Kong



 Abstract Title: Compaction or dispersion: sustainability implications of Guangzhou's urban form

1:20 PM   Author(s): *Jimmy R. Hilley - University of North Alabama
Sunhui Sim - University of North Alabama




 Abstract Title: Measuring Spatial Characteristics of New Urbanism Communities in the US with Geo-Spatial Technology

1:40 PM   Author(s): Jiansheng Wu - Peking University
*Lin Ma - Peking University




 Abstract Title: Dynamics of Land Use Intensity in Urban China: Estimations Based on Nighttime Light Data

2:00 PM   Author(s): *Michael Jerrett - University of California, Berkeley



 Abstract Title: Smart Growth Community Design and Physical Activity in Children



Session Description: This session will provide a broad forum for applied and theoretical research on urban sprawl, sub-urban/inner city development. Topics may include sustainability, smart growth, environmental issues, urban theory, spatial analysis, local economic development issues and land use planning among others.

Context and Objectives
Urban growth takes many forms. Over the years, there have been various attempts to theorize the resulting spatial patterns of land use in World cities. Whether the concentric ring theories, the bid-rent theory, the sectoral model, the multiple nuclei model or the more modern urban realms approach, what is clear is that unprecedented urban growth on the urban fringe has led to dispersion of settlements away from central cities. This dispersed urban development is often referred as sprawl. Urban sprawl has increased in the World over last few decades with unintended and often irreversible consequences such as city central decline, increased reliance on the use of the automobile, and the loss of open space. The discourse on urban sprawl issues is closely related to the concepts of sustainability, smart growth, environmental issues, local economic development and land use planning. This session will bring together researchers with different perspectives on urban and suburban (re)development issues. Presentations providing critical analysis, case studies, and discourse analysis, or addressing issues of measurement and analysis are welcome.

 

4534 Perspectives on (Sub)Urban Sprawl, Smart Growth, Inner City Developments: Issues, Analysis and Critiques (2)

is scheduled on Friday, 4/12/2013, from 2:40 PM - 4:20 PM in Laguna Parlor 3024, Westin, 30th Floor

Sponsorship(s):
Urban Geography Specialty Group
Regional Development and Planning Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Global Urbanization

Organizer(s):
Sun Hui Sim - University of North Alabama
Francis Koti - University of North Alabama

Chair(s):
Sun Hui Sim - University of North Alabama

Abstract(s):
 
2:40 PM   Author(s): *Katherine E Williams - Placeways LLC



 Abstract Title: Exploring the Cost of Urban Sprawl in New Hampshire through a Web-based Map Visualization Tool

3:00 PM   Author(s): *Scott Vargo - Macalester College



 Abstract Title: Comparative Analysis of Suburban Main Street Redevelopment - Concepts and Practices in a Broader Context

3:20 PM   Author(s): *Oscar Sosa - UC Berkeley



 Abstract Title: Globalization, Local Politics, and the Post-developmentalist Capital: Mapping the Transformation of Mexico City 1990-2012.

3:40 PM   Author(s): *Sang Mook Shin - Seoul National University
Kyung Min Kim - Seoul National University




 Abstract Title: Achieving Economic Growth and Local Conservation Through Redevelopment : the Case of Sewoon District in Seoul

4:00 PM   Author(s): *Francis Koti - University of North Alabama



 Abstract Title: Sprawl Effects in Small Rural Towns: A Critical Perspective

4634 Perspectives on (Sub)Urban Sprawl, Smart Growth, Inner City Developments: Issues, Analysis and Critiques (3)

is scheduled on Friday, 4/12/2013, from 4:40 PM - 6:20 PM in Laguna Parlor 3024, Westin, 30th Floor

Sponsorship(s):
Urban Geography Specialty Group
Regional Development and Planning Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Global Urbanization

Organizer(s):
Sun Hui Sim - University of North Alabama
Francis Koti - University of North Alabama

Chair(s):
Francis Koti - University of North Alabama

Abstract(s):
 
4:40 PM   Author(s): *Igor Vojnovic - Michigan State University
Angelo Podagrosi - PitneyBowes MapInfo




 Abstract Title: The Diversity of Gentrification in Houston's Urban Renaissance: From Cleansing the Urban Poor to Super-gentrification

5:00 PM   Author(s): *John Miron - University of Toronto



 Abstract Title: Land-use planning and the organization of cities

5:20 PM   Author(s): *Folarin A Somoye - University of Ibadan



 Abstract Title: Road Traffic Congestion and Intra-City Freight Movement in Ibadan Metropolis

5:40 PM   Author(s): *Ulli Meisel, Professor of Urban Planning & Architecture - ILS - Research Institute for Regional and Urban Development & RWTH Aachen University



 Abstract Title: German Cities: Recent Changes from Established Preservation to Demolition as a New Paradigm - Analyses of Case Examples

6:00 PM   Author(s): *Gregory Kwoka - University of Denver
Eric Boschmann - University of Denver




 Abstract Title: The effect of transit oriented development (TOD) on travel behaviors in Denver, Colorado

1570 Politicizing energy consumption 1: technonatures

is scheduled on Tuesday, 4/9/2013, from 2:40 PM - 4:20 PM in Athenian, Biltmore, Mezzanine Level

Sponsorship(s):
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Political Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Stefan Bouzarovski - University of Manchester
Matthew Huber - Syracuse University

Chair(s):
Conor Harrison - University of North Carolina

Abstract(s):
 
2:40 PM   Author(s): *Gareth Powells - Durham University
Harriet Bulkeley - Durham University
Stephen Lyon - Durham University
Sandra Bell - Durham University






 Abstract Title: Enrolment and Exclusion - The Politics of Smart Electricity Demand Management

3:00 PM   Author(s): *Heather Rosenfeld - University of Wisconsin - Madison



 Abstract Title: 'Plug Into Choice'? Conflicting neoliberalisms and the spatialization of (bio)politics in the installation of and resistance to smart grid technologies

3:20 PM   Author(s): *Gordon Walker - LANCASTER UNIVERSITY



 Abstract Title: Selling the Air: Energy, Conditioning and Circulations

3:40 PM   Author(s): *Rosie Day - University of Birmingham



 Abstract Title: The multi-scalar politics of district heating connection in Lerwick, Shetland Islands

4:00 PM   Author(s): *Andrew Karvonen - University of Manchester



 Abstract Title: The politics of heat: reconfiguring domestic energy provision in the UK



Session Description: This group of sessions is aimed at developing a conceptualization of energy consumption as a political site and practice. Papers highlight the different ways in which energy circulations within households and communities intersect with the everyday politics of technology, nature and social inequality. As a whole, the papers draw attention to the social and technical functioning of the infrastructural assemblage embedded in domestic energy flows. In the first of the two sessions, we reflect on the energy consumption-technology-nature nexus.

 

1670 Politicizing Energy Consumption 2: Responsibility and Agency

is scheduled on Tuesday, 4/9/2013, from 4:40 PM - 6:20 PM in Athenian, Biltmore, Mezzanine Level

Sponsorship(s):
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Political Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Rosie Day - University of Birmingham
Conor Harrison - University of North Carolina

Chair(s):
Stefan Bouzarovski - University of Manchester

Abstract(s):
 
4:40 PM   Author(s): *Conor Harrison - University of North Carolina



 Abstract Title: Energy poverty in Rocky Mount Mills, 1929-1933

5:00 PM   Author(s): *HELENE SUBREMON - UMR CNRS LATTS 8134/ Ecole des Ponts ParisTech
Benoite DECUP-PANNIER - UMR CNRS LATTS 8134/Ecole des Ponts ParisTech
Jerome HUGUET - UMR CNRS LATTS 8134/Ecole des Ponts ParisTech





 Abstract Title: Energy constraint and social innovation or how to bring domestic energy uses to political level

5:20 PM   Author(s): *Sara Fuller - City University of Hong Kong
Maria Francesch-Huidobro - City University of Hong Kong




 Abstract Title: Assessing responsibility for low carbon living in Hong Kong

5:40 PM   Author(s): *Saska Petrova - University of Manchester
Stefan Bouzarovski - University of Manchester




 Abstract Title: Conceptualizing energy vulnerability at the household and community level

6:00 PM   Author(s): *Autumn Thoyre - UNC-Chapel Hill



 Abstract Title: Who owns North Carolina's negawatts? Climate change, free light bulbs, and green neoliberalism

 

3514 Re-cycling, or The Afterlives of Processes, Policies and Artifacts Past (VOLUME ONE)

is scheduled on Thursday, 4/11/2013, from 2:40 PM - 4:20 PM in Santa Anita A, Westin, Lobby Level

Sponsorship(s):
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Cultural Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Jordan Howell - Michigan State University
Kerri Jean Ormerod - University of Arizona

Chair(s):
Jordan Howell - Michigan State University

Abstract(s):
 
2:40 PM   Author(s): *Kerri Jean Ormerod - University of Arizona



 Abstract Title: Sewage as source water: The politics of engineering effluent for drinking water supply

3:00 PM   Author(s): *Jordan Howell - Michigan State University



 Abstract Title: Partial Solutions at Best: Recycling on Maui, 1970-2012

3:20 PM   Author(s): *Padma Chirumamilla - University of Michigan



 Abstract Title: Things falling apart: obsolete electronic technology, reuse and everyday life in South Asia

3:40 PM   Author(s): *Virginia W Maclaren - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO



 Abstract Title: Recycling Gone Wrong: How Undesirable Materials End Up in the Recycling Stream

4:00 PM   Author(s): *Etienne Turpin - University of Michigan



 Abstract Title: Cumulus Landscapes, or Aesthetics is Abeyance



Session Description: In this session we examine the concept of re-cycling. Why the hyphen? While some papers will discuss recycling in the literal sense (e.g., plastic, wastewater, etc.) we also explore the ways in which policies, practices, (material) artifacts, and ideas from the past continue to live on and circulate through contemporary life and landscape. We use the concept of recycling in the abstract to ask questions about the collection, modification, and eventual redistribution of these 'things' (in the Latourian sense). A key focus of the session is to better understand the ways in which recycling leads to not only the re-production of materials and landscapes - with attendant cultural, political, material, and envirotechnical impacts - but also the re-production of ideologies and power structures. At the same time, we must acknowledge that despite (or because of?) the continual re-circulation of these materials and ideas, much like old newsprint in the pulper or wastewater in the settling tank, the re-fashioned remnants are never quite the same as they were in their original form. We think there is much to be gleaned from putting literal and figurative notions of recycling in conversation, and to these ends we seek papers on the following topics and questions:

   - technologies of recycling, literal and figurative
   - modifications to material /ideology/landscape that result from recycling
   - the recycling of landscapes (e.g., nuclear or contaminated sites being 'repackaged')
   - the social/cultural/ideological aspects of closed-loop systems
   - the rediscovery of the past and its reintroduction to the present
   - museums as sites of re-circulation
   - the limits of recycling, an/or resistance to recycling
   - recycled versus 'virgin' materials/concepts
   - recycling policy/-ies

 

3614 Re-cycling, or The Afterlives of Processes, Policies and Artifacts Past (VOLUME TWO)

is scheduled on Thursday, 4/11/2013, from 4:40 PM - 6:20 PM in Santa Anita A, Westin, Lobby Level

Sponsorship(s):
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Cultural Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Jordan Howell - Michigan State University
Kerri Jean Ormerod - University of Arizona

Chair(s):
Kerri Jean Ormerod - University of Arizona

Abstract(s):
 
4:40 PM   Author(s): *Robert Kopack - Department of Geography Michigan State University



 Abstract Title: Refashioning the Soviet Techno-Industrial Landscape for a New Kazakh Future

5:00 PM   Author(s): *Yeesheen Yang, Ph.D. - University of California, San Diego



 Abstract Title: The Afterlives of Organs: Bioethics, Organ Transfer Networks, and End-of-Life Processes

5:20 PM   Author(s): *Adam Diamond - American University



 Abstract Title: Contingencies and Exigencies: How Ideology, Institutions and Geography Influence Organic Waste Recycling Policy in Germany and the United States

5:40 PM   Discussant: Scott Kirsch - University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill




 

Discussant(s):
Scott Kirsch - University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

2447 Recycling Landscapes of Traditional Energies (energy transitions, renewables, brownfields, and environmental restoration)

is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/10/2013, from 12:40 PM - 2:20 PM in Malibu Parlor 3178, Westin, 31st Floor

Sponsorship(s):
Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Bohumil Frantal - Institute of Geonics, Czech Academy of Sciences
Stanislav Martinat - Institute of Geonics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Ostrava

Chair(s):
Bohumil Frantal - Institute of Geonics, Czech Academy of Sciences

Abstract(s):
 
12:40 PM   Author(s): *Bohumil Frantal - Institute of Geonics, Czech Academy of Sciences
*Robert Osman - Institute of Geonics, Academy of Science, Czech Republic




 Abstract Title: Renewable energy developments on brownfields: some evidence on diverging policies, practices and public attitudes from the USA, Germany and Czech Republic.

1:00 PM   Author(s): *Valeryia Fyodorova - Chicago State University



 Abstract Title: Suitability Analysis of Wind Energy Development on Brownfield, Landfill and Industrial Sites in Chicago Metropolitan Area

1:16 PM   Author(s): *Lynn M. Patterson, Ph.D. - Kennesaw State University



 Abstract Title: Renewable Energy in Canada: Local Economic Development Opportunities

1:32 PM   Author(s): *Shawn K Olson - University of Colorado, Boulder



 Abstract Title: Green Energy in a Red State: Cultural roadblocks and passageways to renewable energy development in the American West

1:48 PM   Author(s): *Marisol Becerra - University of Michigan



 Abstract Title: Environmental Justice for Whom? Brownfield Redevelopment and Gentrification in the City of Chicago

2:04 PM   Author(s): *Stanislav Martinat - Institute of Geonics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Department of Environmental Geography
Dan Van der Horst - University of Birmingham, School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences




 Abstract Title: Biogas development as a new form of energy production: lessons from a comparative survey in the Czech Republic and UK

 

Session Description: We live in the stage of so called ´third energy transition´, a transition from the fossil-fuel-powered age being distinguished by dominance of traditional energies and industries into the post-industrial era which is characterized by the scarcity - of natural resources, energies, and living spaces, and by searching for alternative forms of energies and sustainable land-uses. We need to globally cope with urgent challenges in the form of climate changes; energy demand, energy sustainability and security; urban sprawl; environmental restoration and toxic waste cleanup; etc. While a free developable land gets less available and more expensive in highly populated areas, there are wide areas and plenty of sites which have previously been utilized for traditional energetics, mining, or other industries and are not currently under use, are vacant, abandoned and often contaminated (labeled as ´brownfields´ or ´blights´). In respect to above mentioned global trends there is a pressure for regeneration (recycling) of these brownfield sites and their new use whether for renewable energy development (e.g. solar parks, wind farms, growing energy crops and biogas plants, etc.... or so called ´brightification´ of derelict sites), other manufacturing or commercial redevelopments or non-productive (recreation, re-naturalization) purposes. The aim of our session is to share and confront experiences concerning the aforementioned issues from different geographical perspectives (comparison of the experiences from the USA, Europe, China, South America, etc.), land-use and political-institutional contexts, to identify common issues and main divergences, and formulate some "lessons" which countries at different stages of development may learn from each other.

 

3559 Reworking Urban Nature: Tensions and Synergies in the Greening of Cities I

is scheduled on Thursday, 4/11/2013, from 2:40 PM - 4:20 PM in Olvera, The LA Hotel, Level 2

Sponsorship(s):
Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Andrew Karvonen - University of Manchester
Stephanie Pincetl - University of California

Chair(s):
Stephanie Pincetl - University of California

Abstract(s):
 
2:40 PM   Author(s): *Jochen Monstadt - Darmstadt University of Technology



 Abstract Title: Greening Los Angeles? Urban obduracies and the struggle towards green urbanism in the infrastructural city

3:00 PM   Author(s): *James Evans - University of Manchester



 Abstract Title: From Endless Village to Resilient City: the power and promise of contemporary discourses governing urban nature

3:20 PM   Author(s): *Ursula Lang - University of Minnesota



 Abstract Title: The rhythms of yards: time and nature in the city

3:40 PM   Author(s): *Henrik Ernstson, PhD - African Centre for Cities, University of Cape Town
Jane Battersby, PhD - African Centre for Cities, University of Cape Town
Marnie Graham - Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University
Mary Lawhon, PhD - African Centre for Cities, University of Cape Town
Joshua Lewis - Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University
Jessica Rattle - African Centre for Cities, University of Cape Town
Sverker Sörlin, Professor - Environmental Humanities Lab, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) Stockholm









 Abstract Title: Reworking urban natures through empirical case studies in Cape Town: Contestations through alien trees, indigenous shrubs, wetlands and vegetables

4:00 PM   Author(s): *Marla R Emery, Ph.D. - USDA Forest Service
Patrick T. Hurley, Ph.D. - Ursinus College
Rebecca McLain, Ph.D. - Portland State University
Melissa Poe, Ph.D. - Independent Scholar
Lindsay Campbell - USDA Forest Service
Erika Svendsen, Ph.D. - USDA Forest Service








 Abstract Title: Wild food spaces in New York City



Session Description: Today, there are multiple competing theories and perspectives on the presence, meaning, and utility of urban nature. Ideas about ecosystem services, resilience, landscape urbanism, urban agriculture, green and blue infrastructure, urban political ecology, metabolism and circulation, urban vulnerabilities, and so on are proliferating at an increasing rate. However, little work has been done to identify the synergies and tensions between these ideas. Are there inherent contradictions between these different perspectives or can they be combined in creative ways to provide better accounts of urban nature? What makes urban nature unique? How is it connected to particular places and practices? How do particular forms of governance produce particular forms of urban nature? And so on. The aim of this session is to develop a comparative dialogue on contemporary conceptions of urban nature. We are interested in interrogating the pluralist character of urban natures through theoretical and empirical research that unpacks the multiple meanings and implications of nature in cities.

 

3659 Reworking Urban Nature: Tensions and Synergies in the Greening of Cities II

is scheduled on Thursday, 4/11/2013, from 4:40 PM - 6:20 PM in Olvera, The LA Hotel, Level 2

Sponsorship(s):
Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group
Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Andrew Karvonen - University of Manchester
Stephanie Pincetl - University of California

Chair(s):
Andrew Karvonen - University of Manchester

Abstract(s):
 
4:40 PM   Author(s): *John Rennie Short - University Of Maryland Baltimore County



 Abstract Title: City, nature and power: the derecho and infrastructure collapse

5:00 PM   Author(s): *Janice Astbury - University of Manchester



 Abstract Title: People-nature collaboration in urban SESs: seeing the system through landscape and managing with emergence

5:20 PM   Author(s): *Sophie Schramm - TU Darmstadt



 Abstract Title: Towards the ideal city - ideas and models in colonial wastewater planning and their adaptation to Hanoi

5:40 PM   Author(s): *Jon Christensen - University of California, Los Angeles



 Abstract Title: City Nature: A Comparative Approach

6:00 PM   Discussant: Stephanie Pincetl - University of California



 

Discussant(s):
Stephanie Pincetl - University of California

 

5253 Sustainable California?

is scheduled on Saturday, 4/13/2013, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Grand Ballroom Salon 2, The LA Hotel, Level 2

Sponsorship(s):
Energy and Environment Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Julie Cidell - University of Illinois

Chair(s):
Allison Lassiter

Abstract(s):
 
10:00 AM   Author(s): *Miriam Greenberg, Assoc. Professor of Sociology - UC Santa Cruz



 Abstract Title: Critical Sustainabilities: Analyzing Competing Discourses of Urban Development in California

10:20 AM   Author(s): *Robert W. Smith, Ph.D., J.D. - University of California, Davis



 Abstract Title: Changing Conceptions of "Impact" under the California Environmental Quality Act

10:40 AM   Author(s): *Deepak Sivaraman - University of California - Los Angeles



 Abstract Title: Has State Funding Made A Difference to Sustainable Communities Research in California?

11:00 AM   Author(s): *Sarah Di Vittorio - University of California, Berkeley



 Abstract Title: The Politics of Payment for Ecosystem Services in a California Watershed

11:20 AM   Author(s): *Allison Lassiter - UC-Berkeley



 Abstract Title: Identifying Spatial Patterns in Residential Water Consumption



Session Description: Papers in this session ground the study of sustainability in the state of California in a number of different ways: discursive analysis of "urban sustainability" and "environmental impact," the role of state funding in sustainability research, payment for ecosystem services, and spatial modeling of residential water consumption.

 

 

PANEL SESSIONS

 

2252 Climate Policy as Industrial Policy: Emerging Geographies in the Making of the Green Economy

is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/10/2013, from 10:00 AM - 11:40 AM in Grand Ballroom Salon 1, The LA Hotel, Level 2

Sponsorship(s):
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group
European Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Jia Ching Chen - University of California, Berkeley
Abigail Martin

Chair(s):
Abigail Martin

Introduction:
Jia Ching Chen - University of California, Berkeley

Panelist(s):
Matthew Huber - Syracuse University
Christian Schulz - Université Du Luxembourg
Robert Krueger - Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Sharmistha Bagchi-Sen - SUNY-Buffalo
Gregory Simon - University of Colorado Denver

Discussant(s):
Richard Walker - University of California-Berkeley



Session Description: Despite the many shortcomings of the UNFCCC Conferences of the Parties, nation states and sub-national state authorities have responded to the challenges of climate change with a broad array of policies. The resulting terrain of governmental and corporate programs linking energy, greenhouse gas reductions and economic development is expansive, underpinning a broad notion of the "the green economy." As new industries emerge promising climate change mitigation through low carbon products and services, the boundaries between climate policy and industrial policy increasingly overlap. Although "industrial policy" is rarely mentioned in critical scholarship on the politics of climate change, at various levels of governance, it has become a more visible component of climate change mitigation strategies. Domestic advocacy groups, governmental officials and private sector actors concerned with "sustainable economic development" have linked climate policy to debates about the economy, rendering efforts to stabilize greenhouse gas levels into political justifications for industrial development. At the transnational level, questions of "differential responsibility" for climate change mitigation arise directly from notions of the "the right to develop" and energy security.

This panel session examines the overlaps between climate policy and industrial policy from a wide array of theoretical and methodological perspectives. Engaging recent scholarship, the contributors raise important questions about knowledge production in climate policy, the political economy of climate change mitigation, and the cultural politics of climate change as an ecological crisis. This session endeavors to build upon these critical approaches to the study of climate policy by examining cases in which industrial policies are shaped by (and constitutive of) intersections between the geographies of energy, climate change mitigation and economic development.

4601 Geographies of Hope Symposium 12: Carving out Future Pathways for Geographies of Hope

is scheduled on Friday, 4/12/2013, from 4:40 PM - 6:20 PM in Beaudry A, Westin, Lobby Level

Sponsorship(s):
Indigenous Peoples Specialty Group
Cultural and Political Ecology Specialty Group
Cultural Geography Specialty Group
Activist Geographies: Struggles for Social and Environmental Justice
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Geographies of Food and Agriculture Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Julianne A. Hazlewood - Trent-in-Ecuador, Trent University

Chair(s):
Mark Palmer - University of Missouri-Columbia


Panelist(s):
T. Garrett Graddy - American University School of International Service
Clare Gupta - Yale University
Julianne A. Hazlewood - Trent-in-Ecuador, Trent University
RDK Herman - National Museum of the American Indian
Jay Johnson - University of Kansas
Alice Kelly - University of California, Berkeley
Beth Rose Middleton - UC Davis
Lindsay Shade - University of Kentucky



Session Description: Wrapping things up for now, the aspiration for this panel is to discuss future directions for geographies of hope and geographies of hope scholars. Geographies of hope for what? So far, what have we come up with? What are geographies of hope and why do they matter? The "Carving out Future Pathways for Geographies of Hope" will involve the organizers from the other 11 geographies of hope panels and paper sessions. These participants will briefly pose some principal questions that have emerged from the 11 previous panels and paper sessions to open up questions of hopeful geographies to the audience of these sessions, now the participants of the closing panel. The main idea of this session is to create a panelists-audience conversational space for future directions of the diverse processes and concepts that constitute pluri-dimensional understandings of geographies of hope, which hold the potentiality to be put into practice for epistemological and material social change and socio-environmental justice. Where do we go from here?

 

3501 Geographies of Hope Symposium 7: Sustaining Resilience in the Face of Climate Change and Its Mitigation

is scheduled on Thursday, 4/11/2013, from 2:40 PM - 4:20 PM in Beaudry A, Westin, Lobby Level

Sponsorship(s):
Indigenous Peoples Specialty Group
Ethics, Justice, and Human Rights Specialty Group
Human Dimensions of Global Change Specialty Group
Activist Geographies: Struggles for Social and Environmental Justice
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Ethnic Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Jay Johnson - University of Kansas

Chair(s):
Jay Johnson - University of Kansas


Panelist(s):
Tracey Osborne - University of Arizona
Julianne A. Hazlewood - Trent-in-Ecuador, Trent University
RDK Herman - National Museum of the American Indian
Zoltan Grossman - The Evergreen State College



Session Description: While the major population centers of the world are only beginning to glimpse the environmental changes related to anthropocentric climate change, less populated areas of the globe, such as the Arctic and Pacific islands, are already under assault. The Indigenous and "other" peoples of these often marginalized regions are responding to the environmental changes that they are witnessing using a variety of techniques and technologies evolved over thousands of years of habitation in these landscapes, as well as through engagement with Western science. As social and natural scientists we have the opportunity to learn from the peoples and communities with ancestral knowledge of these changing environments, established over long periods, which have produced sustainable and resilient strategies for both adapting to global climate change and resisting often unjust mitigation strategies stemming from UNFCCC negotiations.  How these communities respond may provide both hope and answers for other populations' adaptations around the world. This panel will discuss various research projects aimed at understanding Indigenous adaptation and mitigation strategies for sustaining resilient landscapes and cultures in the face of climate of change.

 

2141 Urban Metabolism, Theory and Practice

is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/10/2013, from 8:00 AM - 9:40 AM in Malibu Parlor 3038, Westin, 30th Floor

Sponsorship(s):
Energy and Environment Specialty Group
Urban Geography Specialty Group

Organizer(s):
Stephanie Pincetl - University of California
Mikhail Chester - Arizona State University

Chair(s):
Stephanie Pincetl - University of California

Introduction:
Stephanie Pincetl - University of California

Panelist(s):
Mikhail Chester - Arizona State University
Sinnott Murphy - UCLA
Giovanni Circella - University of California, Davis
Joe Krahe

Discussant(s):
James Evans - University of Manchester



Session Description: Organizers: Stephanie Pincetl (UCLA, Institute of the Environment and Sustainability), Mikhail Chester (ASU, School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment).
Urban metabolism analysis is seen as an important and useful contribution to understanding urban sustainability as it illuminates the flows of goods, materials, energy and other stocks into urban systems, and the waste flows that result.  Most urban metabolism analysis has concentrated on quantifying the flows into and out of systems, and accumulation effects. As cities continue to advance and improve urban sustainability transitional strategies, there is a growing need to connect urban metabolism with high resolution methods that will allow for a better understanding of the impacts from subgroups of the population, industry, or infrastructure services. These methods will enable pointed development of transitional strategies and will provide improved understanding of how urban metabolism flows are enabled by underlying city activities.  This panel welcomes papers that examine urban metabolism methods and theory in the spirit of advancing the use of the concept to help better inform understanding of sustainability.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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